Immigration Minister Sean Fraser MP

Here Is IRCC Minister Response On The Future Of TR2PR


Following today’s immigration levels plan announcement, IRCC Minister Sean Fraser answered questions on the future TR2PR pathway. Last year in April, former Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino announced a new pathway to convert existing and working temporary residents to permanent residents.

The pathway was a part of a special temporary public policy to meet Canada meet its immigration levels goal and help in Canada’s economic recovery. If you are hoping for another TR2PR pathway, this article may help you understand what’s ahead. You can read Minister’s exact response on the TR2PR pathway in later part of this article.

Minister Fraser’s complete response to the TR2PR pathway

“Today’s immigration levels plan does not include repetition of the TR2PR pathway that was developed in the pandemic, which was a response to a very unique time-limited challenge we were facing where the border was closed to international travel to protect public health. That said, we have plans to make it easier for people to convert their temporary residency to permanent residency. 

Tip: Use Google translator in the beginning of this article to understand this in your preferred/native language.

In fact, the number of people who are becoming permanent residents that already have temporary status is enormous. Last year alone, there were 150,000 permanent residents who got their start in Canada as international students. We are going to continue to leverage these temporary programs by increasing our levels space to allow more of them to come to Canada. By looking at what we need to constantly assess the point system in Express Entry to determine the Canadian experience people may have and to factor that in, as well as considering how we can use the Express Entry system to make sure that we are welcoming to people who may not put additional pressure on social services or housing.

There is no one particular solution that will help achieve this problem. There are a number of different tools; in my view, we need to look at every single one of them to make it easier for people to convert temporary status to permanent residency. 

There is more policy work to be done; in particular, I’ll point to my mandate letter commitments to establish a pathway to permanent residency for both temporary workers and international students. The work is on the way right now.”



Will there be TR to PR in 2023?

When asked about the possibility of the next TR2PR pathway or similar program, Minister Fraser explained the pathway as a response to a “unique time-limited challenge.” 

Moreover, the new immigration levels plan does not include the repetition of another TR2PR pathway. Hence, it is more likely that there will not be another TR2PR pathway. However, those with Canadian experience may benefit from the Express Entry system. 

According to the immigration minister, they will assess the Express Entry points system to factor in the Canadian experience. Additionally, use Express Entry to welcome people who will not put additional pressure on social services and housing.  

The Minister ended his response by saying, “There is more policy work to be done.” However, following the mandate letter, he is committed to establishing pathways for international students and foreign workers. “The work is on the way right now,” said minister Fraser.  

What was the TR2PR pathway

In response to border constraints, Canada temporarily established the TR2PR pathway in 2021 to assist in achieving its immigration goal. Through the TR2PR program, 80,000 temporary workers in Canada could convert to permanent residents. Previous immigration minister, Marco Mendicino, started this initiative. 

However, due to growing immigration backlogs, several TR2PR applicants are still waiting for their applications to be processed. As mentioned earlier, the new pathway will most likely be linked to the Express Entry system and may offer additional points to the Canadian experience. 

Temporary residents in Canada should continue to explore existing pathways for permanent residency and work towards their eligibility.