LinkedIn

Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile – Here Are 7 Important Tips


A lot of people feel that finding a job in Canada can be difficult. However, if you use the right tips and tricks, you can get your dream job in Canada. There is a huge hidden job market in Canada. This means that about 60-80% of the jobs are filled without the employer advertising them publicly. So, it is very important that you build your network. LinkedIn is an excellent tool to do this. 

LinkedIn is one of the most commonly used social platforms for professionals. You can connect with other professionals and your dream job. Moreover, you can highlight your experience and skills. This makes it easier for recruiters to know you better. However, you have to make sure that your Linkedin is well-optimized. This will help you build your professional network strategically.

If you are new to using LinkedIn or are not sure how to optimize your LinkedIn profile for a job search in Canada, don’t worry we have got you covered. This article lists the top 7 tips to optimize your LinkedIn profile. 


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1. Complete your profile

The first thing that you should do is complete your profile. Having a complete profile shows that you are professional. Also, it makes you more visible to recruiters. Your LinkedIn profile speaks for you to all potential employers. So, make sure that you have a photo, and a generic summary and highlight all your skills, projects, interests, and certifications in relevant sections. 

2. Use a professional headshot

Having a professional photo is very important while optimizing your LinkedIn profile. Your picture should not have a distracting background. Avoid any grainy or low-quality images. Also, try to feature your face in the majority of your frame. Lastly, make sure to have a smile and a friendly expression. 

3. Have a compelling headline

Your headline is a great opportunity to show who you are. It should be more than just what you do. You should try to showcase why you are unique. Include details that a recruiter will care about. Moreover, using keywords in your headline can improve your rankings as well as your visibility. 

4. Have an engaging professional summary

Your summary section in the profile is a perfect place to tell about you and your professional brand. You should mention your top skills and qualities. Include three to five sentences about your experience. Also, you should mention your future goals. Lastly, include ways by which other professionals can engage with you. 

5. Focus on your profile SEO

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is an important component of your LinkedIn profile. You should try to add relevant keywords in your field to your profile. Try to add backlinks to your profile from other websites. This can include job portals and social networking platforms. Lastly, try to publish posts on Instagram. This will bring more people to your platform. Thus, your chances of hiring will increase. 

6. Get Recommendations

Recommendations on LinkedIn are like references from people in your network. You should request these from your current or former managers. Also, you can ask your colleagues too. This not only boosts your profile but also builds trust and authoritativeness. You can think of recommendations like reviews on your profile. Recruiters are able to make informed decisions based on these recommendations. 

7. Build your network

The main purpose of LinkedIn is to build your network. So, you should connect with like-minded people. Don’t hesitate to message professionals, employers, recruiters, entrepreneurs, and others in your industry. This will help you get noticed by other professionals. This in turn will help you build a solid relationship. Some of your connections might in turn recommend you for jobs that they know are hiring. 

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Latest Canada Immigration News & Articles

  • Recommendations To Improve Canada Immigration Made By CIMM

    The Canadian House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration (CIMM) released a report, Promoting Fairness in Canada Immigration Decisions, where the Committee investigated visa outcomes in the immigration system. Upon examination, they found the system systematically and unjustifiably disfavours particular groups based on race and country of origin.

    As a result, the Committee makes wide-ranging suggestions to improve the immigration system, which consistently disadvantages some groups depending on race and country of origin.

    After hearing from several immigration advocates, lawyers, and settlement agency staff, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration decided to examine the immigration system. 



    CIMM’s Key recommendations for the immigration system 

    IRCC will share their response to the CIMM report and recommendations in a few months. Meanwhile, below are the key recommendations:

    • Visa officers should record applicant interviews to prevent miscommunication.
    • Ottawa should expand the extraordinary measures already available to Ukrainians, such as the provision allowing for the sponsorship of extended family members to people from other nations and regions experiencing humanitarian crises.
    • The Canadian government should establish a separate monitoring body responsible for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), whose mandate should include dealing with racism and complaints concerning the agency. 
    • Immediate implementation of an Anti-Racism Quality Assurance process for decisions made by visa officers to investigate the impact of individual bias and systemic racism on decisions and refusal rates at visa offices
    • Requesting that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) dedicate more resources to process caregiver permanent residency applications from all streams faster. 

    As per IRCC, they train all officers to assess all applications equally and use the same criteria regardless of their country of origin. With the upcoming reports, they are looking to examine the impact on racialized applicants and minority community members. 

    CIMM highlights longer wait times in application processing 

    According to the Committee’s information, waiting for durations for various refugee groups may differ depending on shifting government priorities and quotas.

    A non-denominational charitable group called Remember Ministries’ executive director, Jennifer Miedema informed the Committee that fund allocation tells you where priorities are placed or who are the favoured demographics.

    Miedema says that “the uneven distribution of delays equals the uneven distribution of suffering,” adding that even holding out hope for final resettlement could be harmful over a prolonged period of waiting and delay.

    Further, she explains the impact on refugees, as their hopes are raised when they submit their applications, but they need to wait for a year or two without any response. As a result, it has a heavy impact on their mental health. 

    According to the Parliamentary Committee, the government should raise the overall number of refugees it welcomes to Canada during a crisis rather than backtrack on or delay receiving those whose applications are currently on hold. 

    They also want a complete racial equity assessment of Canada’s immigration and refugee system and to allocate more resources to process and give priority to privately sponsored refugees. 

    An increasing number of federal appeals 

    The number of people requesting federal appeals to become new Canadians has increased seven times in the last three years. 

    The court system is becoming overburdened with these judicial requests to contest allegedly unjust decisions made by visa officers and procedural delays. These applications are a judicial remedy in the immigration context that compels the IRCC to carry out a public legal obligation owed to an applicant.

    The recording of candidate interviews has been recommended as a potential solution to help with court-ordered redeterminations of unsuccessful applications. According to Vancouver-based immigration lawyer Victor Ing, IRCC needs to be more transparent and honest with clients to avoid more mandamus applications.

    Next, the Committee highlighted the increased wait times in the caregiver program. 

    The caregiver Program has the longest wait times

    The Live-in Caregiver Program saw some of the longest wait times before and after the pandemic. For example, the average time to process caregiver visas in 2020 was about 57 months and two days. While in 2021, the wait time was 68 months plus one day to process applications. 

    As a result, 15,621 applications were pending or anticipated to be pending in the Home Child-Care Provider Pilot backlog as of December 31, 2021. In addition, there were 1,639 more applications in the Live-in Care Program’s database.

    Arlene Ruiz, a licensed and regulated immigration consultant and a recruiter from Alexene Immigration & Employment Services, informed the Committee that many caregivers are from the Philippines. For them, the delays in application processing cause breakdowns in their marriages and children growing out of their dependent status. 

    Immigration attorney Steven Meurrens also mentions that the IRCC lacks transparency, which adds to the problem. For example, the processing times mentioned on IRCC are inaccurate. Further, the Access to Information Act shows that there have been no caregiver files processed since 2019.

    Following this month’s announcement by the federal Minister of Immigration, Sean Fraser, that Canada aims to settle 500,000 new immigrants by 2025, a new report by the Parliament has been released.

    The announcement comes after a record-breaking year for immigration to Canada in 2021, when more than 405,000 people arrived. The nation is also dealing with an unprecedented backlog of visa applications, with 2.2 million being processed by IRCC as of this month.

    Source: CIMM Report


  • Know Latest Average Weekly Earnings In Canada & All The Provinces

    On November 24, 2022 – Statistics Canada released September 2022 data for average weekly earnings in Canada and all provinces. Due to administrative steps that lead to the collection and compilation of data from our widely dispersed Canada, this data is typically delayed by two months.

    In September 2022, the number of employees receiving pay or benefits from their employer increased by 85,300 (+0.5%), according to the Survey of Employment, Payrolls, and Hours. Average weekly earnings in Canada is at $1,175.37, an increase of 3.5% year-on-year.

    Overall, the payroll employment were largest in Quebec (+39,100; +1.0%), Ontario (+15,300; +0.2%), British Columbia (+10,500; +0.4%) and Alberta (+10,400; +0.5%). The only province to see a decrease in payroll employment was Newfoundland and Labrador (-900; -0.4%).

    Overall, average weekly earnings increased by 3.5% year on year in September 2022, slightly higher than the 3.2% increase in August. Below are the province-wise and industry-wise weekly earnings as per Statistics Canada.

    Industry-Wise Weekly Earnings in Canada (Including overtime) – September 2022

    IndustryAverage Weekly Earnings
    Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction2304.44
    Utilities1927.56
    Finance and insurance1724.12
    Professional, scientific and technical services1639.86
    Information and cultural industries1621.54
    Public administration1532.19
    Management of companies and enterprises1493.67
    Construction1456.61
    Forestry, logging and support1411.59
    Wholesale trade1399.45
    Manufacturing1248.50
    Transportation and warehousing1226.55
    Real estate and rental and leasing1204.10
    Sector aggregate1175.37
    Educational services1145.01
    Health care and social assistance1016.67
    Other services (excluding public administration)981.10
    Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services952.89
    Arts, entertainment and recreation729.04
    Retail trade704.73
    Accommodation and food services468.30


    Province-Wise Weekly Earnings in Canada

    GeographyWeekly Earnings Sep 2022Weekly Earnings Aug 2022
    Nunavut$1593.33$1559.50
    Northwest Territories$1560.30$1552.27
    Yukon$1334.02$1348.75
    Alberta$1266.05$1257.16
    Ontario$1206.70$1198.79
    British Columbia$1175.98$1170.23
    Newfoundland and Labrador$1159.31$1145.71
    Saskatchewan$1155.70$1143.55
    Quebec$1118.25$1120.40
    New Brunswick$1082.99$1066.62
    Manitoba$1066.67$1070.27
    Nova Scotia$1020.83$1027.02
    Prince Edward Island$985.73$975.54

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Which Canadian province has the highest average weekly earnings?

    Nunavut has the highest weekly earnings at $1593.33 followed by Northwest Territories at $1560.30 and Yukon at $1334.02. However, these provinces have very low population being in the northern Canada.

    Alberta has the average weekly earnings of $1266.05 among the major Canadian provinces followed by Ontario at $1206.70 and British Columbia at $1175.98.

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Canada?

    Canada has the average weekly earnings of $1,175.37 as per latest data by Statistics Canada released on November 24, 2022.

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Ontario and British Columbia?

    Ontario has the average weekly earnings of $1206.70, while British Columbia has average weekly earnings at $1175.98

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Quebec?

    Quebec has an average weekly earnings of $1118.25

    Source: Statistics Canada


  • Atlantic Immigration Program Eligibility With New TEER NOC

    The Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) provides a pathway to permanent residency for qualified foreign workers and international graduates who desire to work and live in one of Canada’s four Atlantic provinces; Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island.

    Therefore, those struggling due to high CRS scores in Express Entry can consider this pathway a potential option. Furthermore, TEER 4 (or NOC C) are also eligible for Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP). This article enlists the program requirements and how you can qualify for the program. 

    Who can apply for the Atlantic Immigration Program? 

    If you would like to participate in this program, you must meet the following eligibility requirements: 

    • Posses qualifying work experience, unless you are an international graduate from a recognized post-secondary Atlantic Canada institution 
    • Satisfy the education requirements 
    • Meet the language requirements 
    • Have sufficient funds to support yourself and your accompanying family member
      • However, if you are already living and working in Canada on a valid work permit, you do not need to show proof of funds. 

    If you fulfill all these requirements, you can begin looking for work with a designated Atlantic employer. Below, you can find a detailed explanation of all the required eligibility criteria. 



    Work experience requirements 

    In the last five years, you must have worked 30 hours per week for at least one year, totalling 1,560 hours. 

    Here’s how you can calculate your hours: 

    • Calculate the hours worked in part-time and full-time jobs. 
    • Only count the hours for paid work, where volunteering or unpaid internships do not count. 
    • Do not count hours when you are self-employed. 
    • Include hours worked inside or outside Canada, and ensure that you were legally authorized to work in Canada as a temporary resident. 
    • In your calculations, count the hours you accumulated over at least 12 months. 
    • Count job experience gained while studying as long as the work hours do not exceed the maximum allowed. 

    The acquired work experience should be among the following  National Occupational Classification (NOC) TEERs.

    • TEER 0 (management jobs such as restaurant managers or mine managers)
    • TEER 1 (professional jobs that usually need a degree from a university, such as doctors, dentists or architects)
    • TEER 2 (technical jobs and skilled trades requiring at least 2 years of college or apprenticeship, or occupations with supervisory or safety responsibilities such as police officers and firefighters)
    • TEER 3 (technical jobs and skilled trades requiring less than 2 years of college or apprenticeship; or more than 6 months of on-the-job training)
    • TEER 4 (intermediate jobs that usually call for high school and/or several weeks of job-specific training, such as industrial butchers, long-haul truck drivers, or food and beverage servers)

    Your work experience must include most of the primary responsibilities in your NOC’s description and the main duties. 

    Requirements for international graduates 

    If you are an international graduate, you do not need to satisfy the work experience requirements. However, you must meet the following criteria: 

    • Have a degree, diploma, certificate, or trade or apprenticeship that
    • You were a full-time student for the entire time you were studying.
    • Lived in one of the four provinces for at least 16 months in the last two years before graduation, these provinces include:
      • New Brunswick
      • Nova Scotia
      • Newfoundland and Labrador or
      • Prince Edward Island
    • Had a valid permit while studying, living or working in Canada 

    Education requirements 

    You must meet one of the following requirements: 

    • If you have a job offer at the NOC 2021 TEER 0 or 1 category, you must have a Canadian one-year post-secondary educational credential or higher, or the equivalent from outside Canada.
    • If you have a job offer at the NOC 2021 TEER 2, 3 or 4 category, you must have a Canadian high school diploma, or the equivalent from outside Canada.

    If you studied outside of Canada, you would need an educational credential assessment (ECA) to demonstrate that your studies are at or above the required level of education for your employment offer.

    Additionally, your educational credential assessment (ECA) must be under five years old from the date you submit your application. 

    Language requirements 

    You must fulfill the minimal language criteria for the NOC category applicable to your employment offer. It might be either the meeting of the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) for English or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) for French. 

    Each NOC category’s minimum language requirements are: 

    • CLB/NCLC 5 for TEER 0, 1, 2 or 3
    • CLB/NCLC 4 for TEER 4

    Ensure that your language results are from a designated language testing organization, which must be less than two years old when you apply. 

    Required settlement funds

    Unless you already have a valid work permit and are currently working in Canada, you must demonstrate that you have enough funds to sustain yourself and your family after arriving in Canada.

    Some of the other requirements are you:

    • Can not borrow settlement funds from another person.
      • Must have this money to cover your family’s living expenses even if they are not coming with you. 
    • Provide evidence to your home country’s Canadian visa office that you have sufficient funds when you apply to immigrate. 
    • The amount of money required to sustain your family depends on the size of your family. These fund requirements are updated each year. 
    Number of family members
    (including those you support that aren’t immigrating with you)
    Funds required
    (in Canadian dollars)
    1$3,327
    2$4,142
    3$5,092
    4$6,183
    5$7,013
    6$7,909
    7$8,806
    For each additional family member$896

    Getting a job offer 

    As mentioned earlier, you need a job offer from designated employers from one of the four provinces. You can find these employers on each province’s website:

    The job offer must meet all of the following requirements: 

    • In addition, the job offer should be full-time, non-seasonal and have consistent and regularly scheduled paid employment throughout the year.  
    • Employers must offer you a position that will last at least one year for NOC 2021 TEER 0, 1, 2, or 3 category (1 year from when you become a permanent resident).
    • The employer must offer you permanent employment with no set end date for NOC 2021 TEER 4 category job offers.
    • The employment offer cannot come from a firm in which you or your spouse possess majority ownership.
    • Unless you are an international graduate from a recognized post-secondary institution in Atlantic Canada, the job offer must be at the same or higher TEER level than the work experience that qualified you for the position (see the chart below).
    • Certain healthcare industry occupations may not require a job offer at the same or higher TEER level as the qualifying work experience.
      • For example, work experience in NOC 32101 (licensed practical nurses) and NOC 31301 (registered nurses) can be used as qualifying work experience if you have a job offer in NOC 33102 (nurse aides, orderlies and patient service associates) or NOC 44101 (home health care workers).

    Qualifying work experience requirement for each NOC level job offer

    NOC 2021 TEER job offer categoryWork experience requirement
    TEER 0TEER 0, 1, 2, 3, 4
    TEER 1TEER 1, 2, 3, 4
    TEER 2TEER 2, 3, 4
    TEER 3TEER 3, 4
    TEER 4TEER 4

    Source: IRCC


  • New Immigration Plan Can Help With Alberta Labour Shortage

    As Canada intends to significantly increase the number of immigrants annually, groups in Alberta believe it will benefit businesses facing labour shortages. The immigration levels plan, which immigration minister Sean Fraser unveiled on November 1, 2022, calls for a massive influx of immigrants to enter the country: 465,000 in 2023, rising to 500,000 in 2025.

    Government has a strong focus on admitting people based on their employment qualifications or experience. Alberta-based organizations want the government to ease limitations on immigrants choosing lower-paying positions and to support organizations that assist newcomers’ resettlement in ensuring that the new Canadians can genuinely help with the labour shortage.



    Calgary Chamber of Commerce Report on Immigration 

    The Calgary Chamber of Commerce released a report outlining the crucial role immigration plays in easing labour shortages. 

    President and CEO of the Calgary Chamber of Commerce, Deborah Yedlin, explained that whether you work in the service industry, technology, energy, or the healthcare industry, everyone is searching for that last unit of labour. Immigration has become important to address the talent shortage that every business faces across the country.

    Regarding the latest immigration levels plan, Yedlin accepts the new plan but suggests expanding the options to low-wage workers rather than solely focusing on highly skilled, technically trained experts. 

    According to Yedlin, there is a bit of a catch-22 with programs like the Alberta Opportunity Stream since you require prior work experience and language proficiency, which limits the pool of immigrants who can apply.

    She explains that the government needs to figure out how to ensure that the ability to come and work is offered as an opportunity for a broader proportion of the immigrant population than it already is, including low-wage workers.

    Affordable housing to attract immigrants

    According to Randy Boissonault, a member of parliament for Edmonton Centre, Alberta’s lower cost of living can draw people.

    Since all of the communities in Alberta have done an excellent job of continuing to create housing, Edmonton and Calgary are at the top of the list for affordable housing nationwide, according to Boissonault.

    He anticipates that the hundreds of thousands of newcomers will be able to fill employment gaps in the IT industry.

    On meeting the Alberta Machine Institute in the heart of Edmonton, they told Boissonault that many of their partners are searching for computer scientists and mathematicians who can significantly advance the field of machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    The provincial government oversees a program whose objective is to hasten the processing of visas for foreign workers hired by IT firms in Alberta.

    Yedlin claimed that because Albertans frequently lack the qualifications required for a position, businesses are forced to rely heavily on immigration. She emphasizes the tech positions that have remained unfilled for a considerable time despite being advertised for months in Calgary. 

    Newcomer settlement organizations need more support.

    Rispah Tremblay, senior manager of settlement services at the Edmonton Mennonite Centre for Newcomers (EMCN), which assists newcomers in settling in the capital area, said the immigration levels plan presents some difficulties for other organizations.

    Such that with increasing numbers, newcomer settlement organizations need additional resources, explained Tremblay. 

    Tremblay says that EMCN would require additional funding to pay employees who handle cases, assist clients in finding housing, and teach languages.

    New immigrants might not be able to integrate into the Canadian workforce without the assistance of the staff members who assist newcomers with their settlement needs.

    There must be an additional help to settle and get the right training or support they need as soon as they get here, she said. It will allow them to integrate and start working immediately.

    Tremblay is also worried that the housing supply would start to run out with everyone migrating here. Although she hasn’t heard anything from the federal government on funding to support service expansion, she anticipates that discussions will begin in the spring.


  • IRCC Increased Staff by 45%, But Processing Woes Continue

    In Canada’s immigration department, new data indicate a significant increase in hiring. However, the processing continues to be slow. The operational capacity of Canada’s immigration department, IRCC has increased by 45 per cent from pre-pandemic levels, according to never-before-published data.

    Canada has already received nearly as many applications for temporary and permanent residents as it did in 2019 before the pandemic in only eight months of 2022.

    After a two-year slowdown, the country’s immigration system is already operating 45 percent above capacity in 2019. As a result, the number of applications for permanent and temporary residents processed through the system is expected to surpass the 3.2 million recorded last year before the pandemic. 



    IRCC increased workforce, yet processing times continue to grow 

    Unprecedented data shows that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada now employs 8,104 front-line operations employees, up from 5,583 in March 2019, with the majority of the new employees hired since the start of 2022. This is true even if the number of employees on leave increased gradually from 559 in March 2019 to 733 in October.

    Additionally, the number of workers who continued to telework decreased from about 100 per cent at the start of the pandemic to 71.8 per cent last month.

    Richard Kurland, an immigration attorney and policy analyst, says more employees can process more files. As a result, it should lead to higher volumes of decisions when combined with the artificial intelligence decision-making system.

    “You are using the A.I. to do the strenuous labour. Now that the files that require human contact are on track and heading in the correct direction, you have more people to handle them.

    However, Immigration officials would prefer to see the following numbers in check, though:

    • Web forms have become the primary method for applicants to contact the department, increasing from 1.61 million in 2020 to 2.26 million in 2021 and 2.42 million as of September this year;
    • Another important inquiry tool is access-to-information requests, which increased from 98,042 before the pandemic to 204,549 in 2021 before falling to 122,016 so far this year;
    • By 2022, there will have been 963 lawsuits filed against the immigration department, up from just 112 in 2019. These lawsuits sought a court order compelling authorities to process files.

    Therefore, not all critics agree that the immigration system has stabilized.

    Lack of clarity for the reasons for processing delays 

    Vancouver immigration attorney Steven Meurrens questioned why there were still backlogs despite having 45 percent more employees processing applications. He says he is confused why processing times “keep getting worse” in multiple programs and certain visa offices.

    Further, he questioned if there are bugs with new technology or if certain visa postings have I.T. issues. Or other Technology-related concerns due to working from home. Unfortunately, since the department won’t reveal, it isn’t easy to deduce what’s happening from the statistics.

    According to Ravi Jain of the Canadian Immigration Lawyers Association, the department’s increased staffing levels did not correspond to the enormous delay in how people were experiencing the online immigration system. He wants a royal commission to investigate the backlogs and delays in immigration.

    In my opinion, they weren’t really doing much, says Jain. But nevertheless, they cannot get away with this. Because it’s harming individuals in so many ways, it just seems “criminal” to me, said Jain.

    Through the main immigration programs, Canada had received more than 2.9 million new applications for permanent and temporary residents as of August 31. Those figures will undoubtedly raise the total above the 3.2 million files in 2019, with four months left in 2022.

    In comparison to the total of 3,225,130 (235,257 permanent and 2.99 million temporary residents) reported in 2019, immigration officers processed 2.25 million immigration petitions throughout the time period—207,590 permanent and 2.04 million temporary immigrants.

    Source: Toronto Star


  • New NOC Codes: Step-Wise Guide To Find Your NOC

    New NOC codes: On November 16, IRCC switches to the new 2021 National Occupational Classification (NOC) version in alignment with Employment and Social Development of Canada (ESDC). It implies that the NOC 2016 skill type and skill level framework (NOC 0, A, B, C, and D) will now be represented by new 6-category system representing the training, education, experience, and responsibilities (TEER) required to work in an occupation.

    As a result, the previous four-digit codes will become five digits under the new NOC 2021. It will also impact the eligibility criteria for all programs that use NOC. To prepare for these changes, you can learn the following in this article:

    Steps to find new NOC code 

    Step 1: Visit the National Occupational Classification (NOC) official website. 

    NOC 2021 and TEER

    Step 2: You can search by job title or NOC code on this page. If you want to search by job title, look for the “Version” section, then click on the box below it that says “NOC 2016 Version 1.3.” Then, it will open a drop-down menu and select the latest “NOC 2021 Version 1.3.”

    NOC 2021 and TEER

    Step 3: Once you select the new NOC 2021 version, enter your job title to find your NOC 2021 code and TEER category. 

    NOC 2021 and TEER

    Below is an example of a job titled Marketing Coordinator. You also view other matching job titles. 

    NOC 2021 and TEER


    Understanding New NOC categories

    All programs that previously used skill types or levels will now use NOC 2021 codes and TEER categories. 

    Most positions will remain in the TEER category, corresponding to the skill level in the table below. However, certain jobs may change to other TEER categories. The most significant change is the subdivision of Skill Level B jobs that will now become TEER 2 or TEER 3 jobs.

    The table below explains the distribution between skill types or levels and corresponding TEER categories. 

    NOC 2021 and TEER
    NOC 2021 and TEER

    Immigration Programs that new NOC will affect 

     Generally, all programs that have used NOC skill types or levels to invite applicants will be affected. Therefore, all the programs below will switch to using NOC 2021 codes and TEER levels. 

    Additionally, several occupations will become eligible and ineligible under specific programs due to the new NOC 2021 implementation. 

    Frequently Asked Questions regarding new TEER system

    Do you need to update your Express Entry profile as new NOC is implemented? 
    Suppose you are an Express Entry candidate who submitted your profile before November 16 but has not yet received an Invitation to Apply (ITA). Then, you must update your Express Entry profile with your new NOC 2021 code and TEER category. 

    If you receive an ITA before November 16, you can submit your Express Entry application using the NOC 2016 system. In addition, you can also refer to the NOC code mentioned on your ITA receipt and submit your application accordingly. However, there is no need for you to update to NOC 2021 if you received an ITA before November 16. 

    How will new NOC affect CRS scores? 
    The points distribution would be similar to what it has been with NOC 2016. Such as, so far, Express Entry applicants with arranged employment in Skill Levels 0, A and B have received 50 additional points. 

    With NOC 2021, applicants will receive 50 additional points for arranged employment provided their NOC is in TEER 0, 1, 2 or 3. 

    Similarly, you will continue to receive points for Canadian education. However, your work experience must be in occupations that are TEER 0, 1, 2 or 3. 

    How can you prepare for new NOC? 
    To be prepared, you can be mindful of the new changes in the TEER lead statements and primary duties. Although most duties may be similar, your work experience letter must reflect the duties mentioned in your new NOC 2021 code and TEER category. 

    Moreover, you must continue to match the duties in your NOC 2021 occupation if you want to claim points for the skilled experience inside and outside Canada.