How To Find LMIA Approved Jobs In Canada?

More Than 4400 LMIA Approved Jobs In Canada – Here Is How To Find One


Getting LMIA-approved jobs in Canada can often be difficult as the employer needs to apply for an LMIA and receive a positive response. Moreover, before hiring a Temporary Foreign Worker for a certain occupation, an employer must obtain a positive LMIA.

In general, Service Canada will issue a positive LMIA if an assessment reveals that hiring a temporary foreign worker (TFW) will positively or neutrally impact the Canadian labour market. 

However, to dodge the lengthy process of getting an LMIA, you can find LMIA-approved jobs using Canada Job Bank. In addition, you can refer to the list of employers who have applied and received a positive LMIA. 

Below are the steps to help you find LMIA-approved jobs on Canada Job Bank and another option to find LMIA-positive employers. 



Steps to find LMIA approved jobs using Canada Job Bank 

Step 1: Visit the official Canada Job Bank Website, then scroll down to “Temporary Foreign Worker.”

Step 2: Once you land on the Temporary Foreign Worker page, you will find a “search” button with the number of job postings. Click on this search button. 

Step 3: After you hit the search button, you can view the number of jobs available and filter through the location, salary, language at work and LMIA status. 

Step 4: Within the filter options (on the left), scroll down to “Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) status” and select the check box that says “LMIA approved.”

After following these steps, you will find the list of available jobs that are also LMIA-approved. Then, you can apply online and reach out to employers directly to express your interest or clarify any position query. 

How to find LMIA positive employers?

As mentioned earlier, employers need to apply for an LMIA and receive a positive response to hire a foreign national. If they receive a negative response, they will not be able to hire a foreign national. 

To avoid job fraud and for interested candidates to access information without paying any fee, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) publishes a list of employers who requested an LMIA and received a positive response. 

ESDC publishes the list of employers who received a positive LMIA each year. So whether you are a temporary foreign worker looking for another employer or someone looking to get a job offer, you can refer to ESDC’s list to find potential employers. 

Additionally, this ESDC’s LMIA-positive employer list is divided into two quarters. To view the list, click here

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  • Express Entry Glitch Invited Some Ineligible Profiles In Latest Draw

    With the implementation of the new TEER system on November 16, IRCC Express Entry management system has reflected several glitches. In addition, many lawyers and immigration specialist have voiced their concerns about the ongoing IRCC glitches. 

    Certain Express Entry profiles didn’t receive an invitation to apply (ITA) in November 23 draw; although, they had CRS score above the declared cut off. While some ineligible profiles got the invite because some profiles received additional CRS points that they were not entitled to.

    This article highlights some of the glitches in the Express Entry system that has affected the system after implementation of new TEER system on November 16. 



    Glitches in the Express Entry system

    Ottawa based Immigration lawyer Tamara Mosher-Kuczer highlighted some of the glitches in the Express Entry system. She mentions that since November 16, there have been “serious” Express Entry glitches. 

    As a result of these glitches, some applicants did not receive an invitation to apply in the latest Express Entry draw, which has had severe consequences for some applicants. 

    “IRCC should own up to the errors, apologize to those in the pool, and ideally find some way to rectify for those seriously impacted,” says Tamara.

    The applicants who did not receive an invitation in the latest Express Entry draw had a Comprehensive Ranking Score (CRS) above the minimum required score to receive an invitation. However, they were not invited. 

    Another glitch was that the applicants did not get the points for their spouse’s Canadian work experience. Generally, applicants receive 70 CRS points for a spouse’s Canadian work experience. 

    Furthermore, some applicants were marked eligible for the Canadian Experience Class and received an invitation to apply, but they did not possess the Canadian work experience to be eligible. 

    In addition, certain applicants received additional CRS points that they were not qualified for and were invited to apply based on those invalid scores. 

    IRCC is yet to respond to glitches

    IRCC is yet to respond to these ongoing glitches. Recently, several applications process has been moved online for faster processing. Yet, they continue to pose problems in the portal. 

    Good news is that certain Express Entry profiles just got lucky because of the above mentioned glitch. However, bad news is that certain deserving Express Entry profiles were left out in the latest Express Entry draw.

    We will continue to update you if there is any future update on the ongoing glitches in the Express Entry system to help you prepare for your immigration journey. 


  • Recommendations To Improve Canada Immigration Made By CIMM

    The Canadian House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration (CIMM) released a report, Promoting Fairness in Canada Immigration Decisions, where the Committee investigated visa outcomes in the immigration system. Upon examination, they found the system systematically and unjustifiably disfavours particular groups based on race and country of origin.

    As a result, the Committee makes wide-ranging suggestions to improve the immigration system, which consistently disadvantages some groups depending on race and country of origin.

    After hearing from several immigration advocates, lawyers, and settlement agency staff, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration decided to examine the immigration system. 



    CIMM’s Key recommendations for the immigration system 

    IRCC will share their response to the CIMM report and recommendations in a few months. Meanwhile, below are the key recommendations:

    • Visa officers should record applicant interviews to prevent miscommunication.
    • Ottawa should expand the extraordinary measures already available to Ukrainians, such as the provision allowing for the sponsorship of extended family members to people from other nations and regions experiencing humanitarian crises.
    • The Canadian government should establish a separate monitoring body responsible for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), whose mandate should include dealing with racism and complaints concerning the agency. 
    • Immediate implementation of an Anti-Racism Quality Assurance process for decisions made by visa officers to investigate the impact of individual bias and systemic racism on decisions and refusal rates at visa offices
    • Requesting that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) dedicate more resources to process caregiver permanent residency applications from all streams faster. 

    As per IRCC, they train all officers to assess all applications equally and use the same criteria regardless of their country of origin. With the upcoming reports, they are looking to examine the impact on racialized applicants and minority community members. 

    CIMM highlights longer wait times in application processing 

    According to the Committee’s information, waiting for durations for various refugee groups may differ depending on shifting government priorities and quotas.

    A non-denominational charitable group called Remember Ministries’ executive director, Jennifer Miedema informed the Committee that fund allocation tells you where priorities are placed or who are the favoured demographics.

    Miedema says that “the uneven distribution of delays equals the uneven distribution of suffering,” adding that even holding out hope for final resettlement could be harmful over a prolonged period of waiting and delay.

    Further, she explains the impact on refugees, as their hopes are raised when they submit their applications, but they need to wait for a year or two without any response. As a result, it has a heavy impact on their mental health. 

    According to the Parliamentary Committee, the government should raise the overall number of refugees it welcomes to Canada during a crisis rather than backtrack on or delay receiving those whose applications are currently on hold. 

    They also want a complete racial equity assessment of Canada’s immigration and refugee system and to allocate more resources to process and give priority to privately sponsored refugees. 

    An increasing number of federal appeals 

    The number of people requesting federal appeals to become new Canadians has increased seven times in the last three years. 

    The court system is becoming overburdened with these judicial requests to contest allegedly unjust decisions made by visa officers and procedural delays. These applications are a judicial remedy in the immigration context that compels the IRCC to carry out a public legal obligation owed to an applicant.

    The recording of candidate interviews has been recommended as a potential solution to help with court-ordered redeterminations of unsuccessful applications. According to Vancouver-based immigration lawyer Victor Ing, IRCC needs to be more transparent and honest with clients to avoid more mandamus applications.

    Next, the Committee highlighted the increased wait times in the caregiver program. 

    The caregiver Program has the longest wait times

    The Live-in Caregiver Program saw some of the longest wait times before and after the pandemic. For example, the average time to process caregiver visas in 2020 was about 57 months and two days. While in 2021, the wait time was 68 months plus one day to process applications. 

    As a result, 15,621 applications were pending or anticipated to be pending in the Home Child-Care Provider Pilot backlog as of December 31, 2021. In addition, there were 1,639 more applications in the Live-in Care Program’s database.

    Arlene Ruiz, a licensed and regulated immigration consultant and a recruiter from Alexene Immigration & Employment Services, informed the Committee that many caregivers are from the Philippines. For them, the delays in application processing cause breakdowns in their marriages and children growing out of their dependent status. 

    Immigration attorney Steven Meurrens also mentions that the IRCC lacks transparency, which adds to the problem. For example, the processing times mentioned on IRCC are inaccurate. Further, the Access to Information Act shows that there have been no caregiver files processed since 2019.

    Following this month’s announcement by the federal Minister of Immigration, Sean Fraser, that Canada aims to settle 500,000 new immigrants by 2025, a new report by the Parliament has been released.

    The announcement comes after a record-breaking year for immigration to Canada in 2021, when more than 405,000 people arrived. The nation is also dealing with an unprecedented backlog of visa applications, with 2.2 million being processed by IRCC as of this month.

    Source: CIMM Report


  • Know Latest Average Weekly Earnings In Canada & All The Provinces

    On November 24, 2022 – Statistics Canada released September 2022 data for average weekly earnings in Canada and all provinces. Due to administrative steps that lead to the collection and compilation of data from our widely dispersed Canada, this data is typically delayed by two months.

    In September 2022, the number of employees receiving pay or benefits from their employer increased by 85,300 (+0.5%), according to the Survey of Employment, Payrolls, and Hours. Average weekly earnings in Canada is at $1,175.37, an increase of 3.5% year-on-year.

    Overall, the payroll employment were largest in Quebec (+39,100; +1.0%), Ontario (+15,300; +0.2%), British Columbia (+10,500; +0.4%) and Alberta (+10,400; +0.5%). The only province to see a decrease in payroll employment was Newfoundland and Labrador (-900; -0.4%).

    Overall, average weekly earnings increased by 3.5% year on year in September 2022, slightly higher than the 3.2% increase in August. Below are the province-wise and industry-wise weekly earnings as per Statistics Canada.

    Industry-Wise Weekly Earnings in Canada (Including overtime) – September 2022

    IndustryAverage Weekly Earnings
    Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction2304.44
    Utilities1927.56
    Finance and insurance1724.12
    Professional, scientific and technical services1639.86
    Information and cultural industries1621.54
    Public administration1532.19
    Management of companies and enterprises1493.67
    Construction1456.61
    Forestry, logging and support1411.59
    Wholesale trade1399.45
    Manufacturing1248.50
    Transportation and warehousing1226.55
    Real estate and rental and leasing1204.10
    Sector aggregate1175.37
    Educational services1145.01
    Health care and social assistance1016.67
    Other services (excluding public administration)981.10
    Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services952.89
    Arts, entertainment and recreation729.04
    Retail trade704.73
    Accommodation and food services468.30


    Province-Wise Weekly Earnings in Canada

    GeographyWeekly Earnings Sep 2022Weekly Earnings Aug 2022
    Nunavut$1593.33$1559.50
    Northwest Territories$1560.30$1552.27
    Yukon$1334.02$1348.75
    Alberta$1266.05$1257.16
    Ontario$1206.70$1198.79
    British Columbia$1175.98$1170.23
    Newfoundland and Labrador$1159.31$1145.71
    Saskatchewan$1155.70$1143.55
    Quebec$1118.25$1120.40
    New Brunswick$1082.99$1066.62
    Manitoba$1066.67$1070.27
    Nova Scotia$1020.83$1027.02
    Prince Edward Island$985.73$975.54

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Which Canadian province has the highest average weekly earnings?

    Nunavut has the highest weekly earnings at $1593.33 followed by Northwest Territories at $1560.30 and Yukon at $1334.02. However, these provinces have very low population being in the northern Canada.

    Alberta has the average weekly earnings of $1266.05 among the major Canadian provinces followed by Ontario at $1206.70 and British Columbia at $1175.98.

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Canada?

    Canada has the average weekly earnings of $1,175.37 as per latest data by Statistics Canada released on November 24, 2022.

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Ontario and British Columbia?

    Ontario has the average weekly earnings of $1206.70, while British Columbia has average weekly earnings at $1175.98

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Quebec?

    Quebec has an average weekly earnings of $1118.25

    Source: Statistics Canada


  • Express Entry Draw Sent 4,750 New Invites For PR-November 23

    Today, Express Entry Draw invited 4,750 profiles to apply for permanent residency (PR). Applicants having a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score of 491 or above received the invitations.

    CRS cut off score has reduced by only 3 points as compared to Express Entry draw on November 9, 2022. Furthermore, number of invites remained same as in the previous draw. This is the 11th all program Express Entry draw this year.

    Below are the details of new All Program Express Entry draw.

    • Number of invitations issued: 4,750
    • Rank required to be invited to apply: 4,750 or above
    • Date and time of round: November 23, 2022 15:42:46 UTC
    • CRS score of lowest-ranked candidate invited: 491
    • Tie-breaking rule: October 13, 2022 11:22:17 UTC

    All program Express Entry draws include all the the Express Entry profiles under Canadian Experience Class (CEC), Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP), and Federal Skilled Trades (FST). Additionally, it also consider profiles under any of the aforementioned categories having a provincial nomination.

    Next Express Entry draw cut off is projected to be around 485 as per CRS score distribution of candidates in the Express Entry pool as of November 22, 2022 listed below.



    CRS score distribution of candidates in the Express Entry pool as of November 22, 2022

    Express Entry

    Latest processing time for Express Entry as of November 22

    • Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) via Express Entry – 14 months
    • Canadian Experience Class – 19 months
    • Federal Skilled Worker Program – 27 months
    • Federal Skilled Trades Program – 49 months

    Full List Of Canada Express Entry Draws In 2022

    DateImmigration programInvitations issuedCRS Score Cut-Off
    November 23, 2022No Program Specified4,750491
    November 9, 2022No Program Specified4,750494
    October 26, 2022No Program Specified4,750496
    October 12, 2022No Program Specified4,250500
    September 28, 2022No Program Specified3,750504
    September 14, 2022No Program Specified3,250510
    August 31, 2022No Program Specified2,750516
    August 17, 2022No Program Specified2,250525
    August 3, 2022No Program Specified2,000533
    July 20, 2022No Program Specified1,750542
    July 6, 2022No Program Specified1,500557
    June 22, 2022Provincial Nominee Program636752
    June 8, 2022Provincial Nominee Program932796
    May 25, 2022Provincial Nominee Program590741
    May 11, 2022Provincial Nominee Program545753
    April 27, 2022Provincial Nominee Program829772
    April 13, 2022Provincial Nominee Program787782
    March 30, 2022Provincial Nominee Program919785
    March 16, 2022Provincial Nominee Program924754
    March 2, 2022Provincial Nominee Program1,047761
    February 16, 2022Provincial Nominee Program1,082710
    February 2, 2022Provincial Nominee Program1,070674
    January 19, 2022Provincial Nominee Program1,036745
    January 5, 2022Provincial Nominee Program392808
    Express Entry Draws – 2022

    What is Express Entry?

    Express Entry system is the fastest way to get Canadian Permanent Residency (PR). It has processing time of 6 months after submission of documents following the ITA.

    The Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS), a points-based methodology, is used by Express Entry to rate applicant profiles. The highest-scoring applicants are given an Invitation to Apply (ITA), after which they can submit an application for permanent residence.

    The Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP), the Canadian Experience Class (CEC), and the Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP) all use Express Entry as their application management system (FSTP).

    Candidates for the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) who are in the Express Entry pool are already qualified for at least one of these programmes.


  • Atlantic Immigration Program Eligibility With New TEER NOC

    The Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) provides a pathway to permanent residency for qualified foreign workers and international graduates who desire to work and live in one of Canada’s four Atlantic provinces; Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island.

    Therefore, those struggling due to high CRS scores in Express Entry can consider this pathway a potential option. Furthermore, TEER 4 (or NOC C) are also eligible for Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP). This article enlists the program requirements and how you can qualify for the program. 

    Who can apply for the Atlantic Immigration Program? 

    If you would like to participate in this program, you must meet the following eligibility requirements: 

    • Posses qualifying work experience, unless you are an international graduate from a recognized post-secondary Atlantic Canada institution 
    • Satisfy the education requirements 
    • Meet the language requirements 
    • Have sufficient funds to support yourself and your accompanying family member
      • However, if you are already living and working in Canada on a valid work permit, you do not need to show proof of funds. 

    If you fulfill all these requirements, you can begin looking for work with a designated Atlantic employer. Below, you can find a detailed explanation of all the required eligibility criteria. 



    Work experience requirements 

    In the last five years, you must have worked 30 hours per week for at least one year, totalling 1,560 hours. 

    Here’s how you can calculate your hours: 

    • Calculate the hours worked in part-time and full-time jobs. 
    • Only count the hours for paid work, where volunteering or unpaid internships do not count. 
    • Do not count hours when you are self-employed. 
    • Include hours worked inside or outside Canada, and ensure that you were legally authorized to work in Canada as a temporary resident. 
    • In your calculations, count the hours you accumulated over at least 12 months. 
    • Count job experience gained while studying as long as the work hours do not exceed the maximum allowed. 

    The acquired work experience should be among the following  National Occupational Classification (NOC) TEERs.

    • TEER 0 (management jobs such as restaurant managers or mine managers)
    • TEER 1 (professional jobs that usually need a degree from a university, such as doctors, dentists or architects)
    • TEER 2 (technical jobs and skilled trades requiring at least 2 years of college or apprenticeship, or occupations with supervisory or safety responsibilities such as police officers and firefighters)
    • TEER 3 (technical jobs and skilled trades requiring less than 2 years of college or apprenticeship; or more than 6 months of on-the-job training)
    • TEER 4 (intermediate jobs that usually call for high school and/or several weeks of job-specific training, such as industrial butchers, long-haul truck drivers, or food and beverage servers)

    Your work experience must include most of the primary responsibilities in your NOC’s description and the main duties. 

    Requirements for international graduates 

    If you are an international graduate, you do not need to satisfy the work experience requirements. However, you must meet the following criteria: 

    • Have a degree, diploma, certificate, or trade or apprenticeship that
    • You were a full-time student for the entire time you were studying.
    • Lived in one of the four provinces for at least 16 months in the last two years before graduation, these provinces include:
      • New Brunswick
      • Nova Scotia
      • Newfoundland and Labrador or
      • Prince Edward Island
    • Had a valid permit while studying, living or working in Canada 

    Education requirements 

    You must meet one of the following requirements: 

    • If you have a job offer at the NOC 2021 TEER 0 or 1 category, you must have a Canadian one-year post-secondary educational credential or higher, or the equivalent from outside Canada.
    • If you have a job offer at the NOC 2021 TEER 2, 3 or 4 category, you must have a Canadian high school diploma, or the equivalent from outside Canada.

    If you studied outside of Canada, you would need an educational credential assessment (ECA) to demonstrate that your studies are at or above the required level of education for your employment offer.

    Additionally, your educational credential assessment (ECA) must be under five years old from the date you submit your application. 

    Language requirements 

    You must fulfill the minimal language criteria for the NOC category applicable to your employment offer. It might be either the meeting of the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) for English or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) for French. 

    Each NOC category’s minimum language requirements are: 

    • CLB/NCLC 5 for TEER 0, 1, 2 or 3
    • CLB/NCLC 4 for TEER 4

    Ensure that your language results are from a designated language testing organization, which must be less than two years old when you apply. 

    Required settlement funds

    Unless you already have a valid work permit and are currently working in Canada, you must demonstrate that you have enough funds to sustain yourself and your family after arriving in Canada.

    Some of the other requirements are you:

    • Can not borrow settlement funds from another person.
      • Must have this money to cover your family’s living expenses even if they are not coming with you. 
    • Provide evidence to your home country’s Canadian visa office that you have sufficient funds when you apply to immigrate. 
    • The amount of money required to sustain your family depends on the size of your family. These fund requirements are updated each year. 
    Number of family members
    (including those you support that aren’t immigrating with you)
    Funds required
    (in Canadian dollars)
    1$3,327
    2$4,142
    3$5,092
    4$6,183
    5$7,013
    6$7,909
    7$8,806
    For each additional family member$896

    Getting a job offer 

    As mentioned earlier, you need a job offer from designated employers from one of the four provinces. You can find these employers on each province’s website:

    The job offer must meet all of the following requirements: 

    • In addition, the job offer should be full-time, non-seasonal and have consistent and regularly scheduled paid employment throughout the year.  
    • Employers must offer you a position that will last at least one year for NOC 2021 TEER 0, 1, 2, or 3 category (1 year from when you become a permanent resident).
    • The employer must offer you permanent employment with no set end date for NOC 2021 TEER 4 category job offers.
    • The employment offer cannot come from a firm in which you or your spouse possess majority ownership.
    • Unless you are an international graduate from a recognized post-secondary institution in Atlantic Canada, the job offer must be at the same or higher TEER level than the work experience that qualified you for the position (see the chart below).
    • Certain healthcare industry occupations may not require a job offer at the same or higher TEER level as the qualifying work experience.
      • For example, work experience in NOC 32101 (licensed practical nurses) and NOC 31301 (registered nurses) can be used as qualifying work experience if you have a job offer in NOC 33102 (nurse aides, orderlies and patient service associates) or NOC 44101 (home health care workers).

    Qualifying work experience requirement for each NOC level job offer

    NOC 2021 TEER job offer categoryWork experience requirement
    TEER 0TEER 0, 1, 2, 3, 4
    TEER 1TEER 1, 2, 3, 4
    TEER 2TEER 2, 3, 4
    TEER 3TEER 3, 4
    TEER 4TEER 4

    Source: IRCC


  • Understanding New Changes To Express Entry With Bill C19 – All You Need To Know

    As Bill C-19 receives royal assent, the Express Entry system will undergo several amendments. These new amendments will bring changes to the Comprehensive Ranking System used to evaluate and rank individuals in the pool.  

    Express Entry includes all major economic immigration categories, such as the Canadian Experience Class, the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, and a component of the Provincial Nominee Program, which will experience changes under Bill C-19 in 2023.  

    Another impact would be on the expression of interest that selects top-ranking candidates through regularly released Ministry instructions. These candidates are later invited to complete an immigration application.  

    To help you prepare for the new changes, below is the summary of amendments in Bill C-19 to the Express Entry system and fee waiver for some IRCC applications. 



    Summary of Bill C-19 Amendments To Express Entry

    Express Entry Selection based on new groups and categories 

    The new amendment will include ministerial instructions to bring additional filters to the Express Entry pool based on groups and categories rather than only immigration class. The ministerial instructions serve as the foundation for the rounds of invites.

    Express Entry ITAs to specify the stream in which the applicant must apply

    Another amendment is to create new categories with eligibility requirements for the purpose of ranking. Wherein if a foreign national qualifies for more than one class, the invitation to apply for permanent residence should specify the stream in which the applicant must apply. 

    Minister to specify an economic goal with each category 

    The new amendment also requires the Minister to specify in the instruction the economic goal that the newly established category will support. 

    Applicants who have lost points due to age can receive a permanent resident visa 

    The amendment establishes exclusions that allow Express Entry permanent residence visas to be given to candidates who have received an invitation to apply but would otherwise have lost eligibility due to changes in their circumstances. 

    For example, suppose an applicant has aged and lost points or lost qualification but has maintained a score equal to the minimum required to rank in the invitation round. In that case, they may be awarded a visa or other documents. 

    Minister’s report to include established category for foreign nationals

    The amendment adds that the Minister’s annual report to Parliament must include instructions to establish any category for foreign nationals in Express Entry. These instructions should include the economic goal it supports and the number of invitations issued under this category. 

    More details on Bill C-19 will be revealed, along with the new exact categories, its eligibility criteria in coming months.

    Changes Under Bill C-19 For Fees Of Some Applications

    The Canada Gazette typically outlines regulations and publishes immigration fees. However, for any changes in immigration fees, they need to go through regulatory impact analysis and have stakeholder input before implementation.  

    Moreover, processing applications for a temporary resident visa, a permanent resident visa, a work permit, a study permit, an extension of an authorization to remain in Canada as a temporary resident, and an authorization to stay 59 Bill C-19 in Canada as a permanent resident are already exempt from the Service Fees Act.

    Other fees for services, such as those associated with processing applications based on humanitarian and compassionate considerations, are exempt. These include applications submitted under public policy, services to obtain travel documents for permanent residents, including permanent resident cards, and services associated with the processing of applications to sponsor members of the family class.

    With Bill C-19, the following new service fees would become exempt:

    • Authorization for a permanent resident to return to Canada;
    • Rehabilitation for determining criminality and serious criminality 
    • Temporary status restoration and 
    • Temporary resident permits