Canada passport office wait times

List Of Canada Passport Offices With New Updated Wait Times


Federal government is now updating the wait times online three times each day to help applicants understand what to expect at passport offices in Canada. This article lists the latest wait times for Canadian passport offices as of 1:15 PM EST today, November 8, 2022 and links you direct to current wait time at respective locations.

Passport Office LocationWait Time
Vancouver, British Columbia
757 Hastings Street West, Office 125
4 hours
Ottawa, Ontario
885 Meadowlands Drive East, Suite 115
3 hours
Brampton, Ontario
40 Gillingham Drive, Suite 401
45 minutes
London, Ontario
301 Oxford Street West, Suite 76
1 hour
Winnipeg, Manitoba
433 Main Street, Suite 400
1 hour, 45 minutes
Saint-Laurent, Quebec
2089 Marcel-Laurin Boulevard, Suite 100
Not Available
Toronto, Ontario
74 Victoria Street, Suite 300
2 hours
Mississauga, Ontario
377 Burnhamthorpe Road East, Main Floor, Suite 22
2 hours, 30 minutes
Whitby, Ontario
1615 Dundas Street East, Suite 6
30 minutes
Kitchener, Ontario
40 Weber Street East, Mezzanine Level
1 hour, 45 minutes
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Passport Office LocationWait Time
Richmond, British Columbia
5611 Cooney Road, Suite 310
3 hours
Chicoutimi, Quebec
98 Racine Street East
1 hour, 45 minutes
Hamilton Ontario
1565 Upper James Street, Unit 3-1
2 hours, 15 minutes
St. Catharines, Ontario
221 Glendale Avenue, Suite 604
2 hours
Calgary, Alberta
220 4th Avenue South East, Suite 150
4 hour, 30 minutes
Montréal, Quebec
200 René-Lévesque Boulevard W., Suite 103, West Tower
15 minutes
Laval, Quebec
2214 Autoroute Chomedey, #20
1 hour
Pointe-Claire, Quebec
6815 Trans-Canada Highway, Suite C-022A
Not Available
North York, Ontario
4900 Yonge Street, 3rd Floor, Suite 380
2 hours
Edmonton, Alberta
9700 Jasper Avenue, Suite 126
4 hours
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Passport Office LocationWait Time
Surrey, British Columbia
1109 Central City, 10153 King George Boulevard
Not Available
Hamilton, Ontario
700 Queenston Road
2 hours, 45 minutes
Scarborough, Ontario
200 Town Centre Court, Suite 210
2 hours, 30 minutes
Québec, Quebec
2640 Laurier Boulevard, 2nd Floor, Suite 200
1 hour
Halifax, Nova Scotia
1800 Argyle Street
30 minutes
Windsor, Ontario
100 Ouellette Avenue, Suite 503
1 hour, 45 minutes
Regina, Saskatchewan
1783 Hamilton Street
2 hours, 45 minutes
Calgary, Alberta
120 – 23 Sunpark Drive SE
1 hour, 30 minutes
Kelowna, British Columbia
471 Queensway, Suite 106
45 minutes
Victoria, British Columbia
1150 Douglas Street, Suite 450
1 hour, 30 minutes
Canada Passport Statistics
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Passport Office LocationWait Time
Thunder Bay, Ontario
979 Alloy Drive, 2nd Floor
30 minutes
Fredericton, New Brunswick
1133 Regent Street, suite 200
45 minutes
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador
100 Hebron Way
30 minutes
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
2325 Preston Ave South, Unit 120
45 minutes
Gatineau, Quebec
210 Champlain
1 hour

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Latest Canada Immigration News & Articles

  • Recommendations To Improve Canada Immigration Made By CIMM

    The Canadian House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration (CIMM) released a report, Promoting Fairness in Canada Immigration Decisions, where the Committee investigated visa outcomes in the immigration system. Upon examination, they found the system systematically and unjustifiably disfavours particular groups based on race and country of origin.

    As a result, the Committee makes wide-ranging suggestions to improve the immigration system, which consistently disadvantages some groups depending on race and country of origin.

    After hearing from several immigration advocates, lawyers, and settlement agency staff, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration decided to examine the immigration system. 



    CIMM’s Key recommendations for the immigration system 

    IRCC will share their response to the CIMM report and recommendations in a few months. Meanwhile, below are the key recommendations:

    • Visa officers should record applicant interviews to prevent miscommunication.
    • Ottawa should expand the extraordinary measures already available to Ukrainians, such as the provision allowing for the sponsorship of extended family members to people from other nations and regions experiencing humanitarian crises.
    • The Canadian government should establish a separate monitoring body responsible for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), whose mandate should include dealing with racism and complaints concerning the agency. 
    • Immediate implementation of an Anti-Racism Quality Assurance process for decisions made by visa officers to investigate the impact of individual bias and systemic racism on decisions and refusal rates at visa offices
    • Requesting that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) dedicate more resources to process caregiver permanent residency applications from all streams faster. 

    As per IRCC, they train all officers to assess all applications equally and use the same criteria regardless of their country of origin. With the upcoming reports, they are looking to examine the impact on racialized applicants and minority community members. 

    CIMM highlights longer wait times in application processing 

    According to the Committee’s information, waiting for durations for various refugee groups may differ depending on shifting government priorities and quotas.

    A non-denominational charitable group called Remember Ministries’ executive director, Jennifer Miedema informed the Committee that fund allocation tells you where priorities are placed or who are the favoured demographics.

    Miedema says that “the uneven distribution of delays equals the uneven distribution of suffering,” adding that even holding out hope for final resettlement could be harmful over a prolonged period of waiting and delay.

    Further, she explains the impact on refugees, as their hopes are raised when they submit their applications, but they need to wait for a year or two without any response. As a result, it has a heavy impact on their mental health. 

    According to the Parliamentary Committee, the government should raise the overall number of refugees it welcomes to Canada during a crisis rather than backtrack on or delay receiving those whose applications are currently on hold. 

    They also want a complete racial equity assessment of Canada’s immigration and refugee system and to allocate more resources to process and give priority to privately sponsored refugees. 

    An increasing number of federal appeals 

    The number of people requesting federal appeals to become new Canadians has increased seven times in the last three years. 

    The court system is becoming overburdened with these judicial requests to contest allegedly unjust decisions made by visa officers and procedural delays. These applications are a judicial remedy in the immigration context that compels the IRCC to carry out a public legal obligation owed to an applicant.

    The recording of candidate interviews has been recommended as a potential solution to help with court-ordered redeterminations of unsuccessful applications. According to Vancouver-based immigration lawyer Victor Ing, IRCC needs to be more transparent and honest with clients to avoid more mandamus applications.

    Next, the Committee highlighted the increased wait times in the caregiver program. 

    The caregiver Program has the longest wait times

    The Live-in Caregiver Program saw some of the longest wait times before and after the pandemic. For example, the average time to process caregiver visas in 2020 was about 57 months and two days. While in 2021, the wait time was 68 months plus one day to process applications. 

    As a result, 15,621 applications were pending or anticipated to be pending in the Home Child-Care Provider Pilot backlog as of December 31, 2021. In addition, there were 1,639 more applications in the Live-in Care Program’s database.

    Arlene Ruiz, a licensed and regulated immigration consultant and a recruiter from Alexene Immigration & Employment Services, informed the Committee that many caregivers are from the Philippines. For them, the delays in application processing cause breakdowns in their marriages and children growing out of their dependent status. 

    Immigration attorney Steven Meurrens also mentions that the IRCC lacks transparency, which adds to the problem. For example, the processing times mentioned on IRCC are inaccurate. Further, the Access to Information Act shows that there have been no caregiver files processed since 2019.

    Following this month’s announcement by the federal Minister of Immigration, Sean Fraser, that Canada aims to settle 500,000 new immigrants by 2025, a new report by the Parliament has been released.

    The announcement comes after a record-breaking year for immigration to Canada in 2021, when more than 405,000 people arrived. The nation is also dealing with an unprecedented backlog of visa applications, with 2.2 million being processed by IRCC as of this month.

    Source: CIMM Report


  • Know Latest Average Weekly Earnings In Canada & All The Provinces

    On November 24, 2022 – Statistics Canada released September 2022 data for average weekly earnings in Canada and all provinces. Due to administrative steps that lead to the collection and compilation of data from our widely dispersed Canada, this data is typically delayed by two months.

    In September 2022, the number of employees receiving pay or benefits from their employer increased by 85,300 (+0.5%), according to the Survey of Employment, Payrolls, and Hours. Average weekly earnings in Canada is at $1,175.37, an increase of 3.5% year-on-year.

    Overall, the payroll employment were largest in Quebec (+39,100; +1.0%), Ontario (+15,300; +0.2%), British Columbia (+10,500; +0.4%) and Alberta (+10,400; +0.5%). The only province to see a decrease in payroll employment was Newfoundland and Labrador (-900; -0.4%).

    Overall, average weekly earnings increased by 3.5% year on year in September 2022, slightly higher than the 3.2% increase in August. Below are the province-wise and industry-wise weekly earnings as per Statistics Canada.

    Industry-Wise Weekly Earnings in Canada (Including overtime) – September 2022

    IndustryAverage Weekly Earnings
    Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction2304.44
    Utilities1927.56
    Finance and insurance1724.12
    Professional, scientific and technical services1639.86
    Information and cultural industries1621.54
    Public administration1532.19
    Management of companies and enterprises1493.67
    Construction1456.61
    Forestry, logging and support1411.59
    Wholesale trade1399.45
    Manufacturing1248.50
    Transportation and warehousing1226.55
    Real estate and rental and leasing1204.10
    Sector aggregate1175.37
    Educational services1145.01
    Health care and social assistance1016.67
    Other services (excluding public administration)981.10
    Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services952.89
    Arts, entertainment and recreation729.04
    Retail trade704.73
    Accommodation and food services468.30


    Province-Wise Weekly Earnings in Canada

    GeographyWeekly Earnings Sep 2022Weekly Earnings Aug 2022
    Nunavut$1593.33$1559.50
    Northwest Territories$1560.30$1552.27
    Yukon$1334.02$1348.75
    Alberta$1266.05$1257.16
    Ontario$1206.70$1198.79
    British Columbia$1175.98$1170.23
    Newfoundland and Labrador$1159.31$1145.71
    Saskatchewan$1155.70$1143.55
    Quebec$1118.25$1120.40
    New Brunswick$1082.99$1066.62
    Manitoba$1066.67$1070.27
    Nova Scotia$1020.83$1027.02
    Prince Edward Island$985.73$975.54

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Which Canadian province has the highest average weekly earnings?

    Nunavut has the highest weekly earnings at $1593.33 followed by Northwest Territories at $1560.30 and Yukon at $1334.02. However, these provinces have very low population being in the northern Canada.

    Alberta has the average weekly earnings of $1266.05 among the major Canadian provinces followed by Ontario at $1206.70 and British Columbia at $1175.98.

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Canada?

    Canada has the average weekly earnings of $1,175.37 as per latest data by Statistics Canada released on November 24, 2022.

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Ontario and British Columbia?

    Ontario has the average weekly earnings of $1206.70, while British Columbia has average weekly earnings at $1175.98

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Quebec?

    Quebec has an average weekly earnings of $1118.25

    Source: Statistics Canada


  • New Immigration Plan Can Help With Alberta Labour Shortage

    As Canada intends to significantly increase the number of immigrants annually, groups in Alberta believe it will benefit businesses facing labour shortages. The immigration levels plan, which immigration minister Sean Fraser unveiled on November 1, 2022, calls for a massive influx of immigrants to enter the country: 465,000 in 2023, rising to 500,000 in 2025.

    Government has a strong focus on admitting people based on their employment qualifications or experience. Alberta-based organizations want the government to ease limitations on immigrants choosing lower-paying positions and to support organizations that assist newcomers’ resettlement in ensuring that the new Canadians can genuinely help with the labour shortage.



    Calgary Chamber of Commerce Report on Immigration 

    The Calgary Chamber of Commerce released a report outlining the crucial role immigration plays in easing labour shortages. 

    President and CEO of the Calgary Chamber of Commerce, Deborah Yedlin, explained that whether you work in the service industry, technology, energy, or the healthcare industry, everyone is searching for that last unit of labour. Immigration has become important to address the talent shortage that every business faces across the country.

    Regarding the latest immigration levels plan, Yedlin accepts the new plan but suggests expanding the options to low-wage workers rather than solely focusing on highly skilled, technically trained experts. 

    According to Yedlin, there is a bit of a catch-22 with programs like the Alberta Opportunity Stream since you require prior work experience and language proficiency, which limits the pool of immigrants who can apply.

    She explains that the government needs to figure out how to ensure that the ability to come and work is offered as an opportunity for a broader proportion of the immigrant population than it already is, including low-wage workers.

    Affordable housing to attract immigrants

    According to Randy Boissonault, a member of parliament for Edmonton Centre, Alberta’s lower cost of living can draw people.

    Since all of the communities in Alberta have done an excellent job of continuing to create housing, Edmonton and Calgary are at the top of the list for affordable housing nationwide, according to Boissonault.

    He anticipates that the hundreds of thousands of newcomers will be able to fill employment gaps in the IT industry.

    On meeting the Alberta Machine Institute in the heart of Edmonton, they told Boissonault that many of their partners are searching for computer scientists and mathematicians who can significantly advance the field of machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    The provincial government oversees a program whose objective is to hasten the processing of visas for foreign workers hired by IT firms in Alberta.

    Yedlin claimed that because Albertans frequently lack the qualifications required for a position, businesses are forced to rely heavily on immigration. She emphasizes the tech positions that have remained unfilled for a considerable time despite being advertised for months in Calgary. 

    Newcomer settlement organizations need more support.

    Rispah Tremblay, senior manager of settlement services at the Edmonton Mennonite Centre for Newcomers (EMCN), which assists newcomers in settling in the capital area, said the immigration levels plan presents some difficulties for other organizations.

    Such that with increasing numbers, newcomer settlement organizations need additional resources, explained Tremblay. 

    Tremblay says that EMCN would require additional funding to pay employees who handle cases, assist clients in finding housing, and teach languages.

    New immigrants might not be able to integrate into the Canadian workforce without the assistance of the staff members who assist newcomers with their settlement needs.

    There must be an additional help to settle and get the right training or support they need as soon as they get here, she said. It will allow them to integrate and start working immediately.

    Tremblay is also worried that the housing supply would start to run out with everyone migrating here. Although she hasn’t heard anything from the federal government on funding to support service expansion, she anticipates that discussions will begin in the spring.


  • IRCC Increased Staff by 45%, But Processing Woes Continue

    In Canada’s immigration department, new data indicate a significant increase in hiring. However, the processing continues to be slow. The operational capacity of Canada’s immigration department, IRCC has increased by 45 per cent from pre-pandemic levels, according to never-before-published data.

    Canada has already received nearly as many applications for temporary and permanent residents as it did in 2019 before the pandemic in only eight months of 2022.

    After a two-year slowdown, the country’s immigration system is already operating 45 percent above capacity in 2019. As a result, the number of applications for permanent and temporary residents processed through the system is expected to surpass the 3.2 million recorded last year before the pandemic. 



    IRCC increased workforce, yet processing times continue to grow 

    Unprecedented data shows that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada now employs 8,104 front-line operations employees, up from 5,583 in March 2019, with the majority of the new employees hired since the start of 2022. This is true even if the number of employees on leave increased gradually from 559 in March 2019 to 733 in October.

    Additionally, the number of workers who continued to telework decreased from about 100 per cent at the start of the pandemic to 71.8 per cent last month.

    Richard Kurland, an immigration attorney and policy analyst, says more employees can process more files. As a result, it should lead to higher volumes of decisions when combined with the artificial intelligence decision-making system.

    “You are using the A.I. to do the strenuous labour. Now that the files that require human contact are on track and heading in the correct direction, you have more people to handle them.

    However, Immigration officials would prefer to see the following numbers in check, though:

    • Web forms have become the primary method for applicants to contact the department, increasing from 1.61 million in 2020 to 2.26 million in 2021 and 2.42 million as of September this year;
    • Another important inquiry tool is access-to-information requests, which increased from 98,042 before the pandemic to 204,549 in 2021 before falling to 122,016 so far this year;
    • By 2022, there will have been 963 lawsuits filed against the immigration department, up from just 112 in 2019. These lawsuits sought a court order compelling authorities to process files.

    Therefore, not all critics agree that the immigration system has stabilized.

    Lack of clarity for the reasons for processing delays 

    Vancouver immigration attorney Steven Meurrens questioned why there were still backlogs despite having 45 percent more employees processing applications. He says he is confused why processing times “keep getting worse” in multiple programs and certain visa offices.

    Further, he questioned if there are bugs with new technology or if certain visa postings have I.T. issues. Or other Technology-related concerns due to working from home. Unfortunately, since the department won’t reveal, it isn’t easy to deduce what’s happening from the statistics.

    According to Ravi Jain of the Canadian Immigration Lawyers Association, the department’s increased staffing levels did not correspond to the enormous delay in how people were experiencing the online immigration system. He wants a royal commission to investigate the backlogs and delays in immigration.

    In my opinion, they weren’t really doing much, says Jain. But nevertheless, they cannot get away with this. Because it’s harming individuals in so many ways, it just seems “criminal” to me, said Jain.

    Through the main immigration programs, Canada had received more than 2.9 million new applications for permanent and temporary residents as of August 31. Those figures will undoubtedly raise the total above the 3.2 million files in 2019, with four months left in 2022.

    In comparison to the total of 3,225,130 (235,257 permanent and 2.99 million temporary residents) reported in 2019, immigration officers processed 2.25 million immigration petitions throughout the time period—207,590 permanent and 2.04 million temporary immigrants.

    Source: Toronto Star


  • New NOC Codes: Step-Wise Guide To Find Your NOC

    New NOC codes: On November 16, IRCC switches to the new 2021 National Occupational Classification (NOC) version in alignment with Employment and Social Development of Canada (ESDC). It implies that the NOC 2016 skill type and skill level framework (NOC 0, A, B, C, and D) will now be represented by new 6-category system representing the training, education, experience, and responsibilities (TEER) required to work in an occupation.

    As a result, the previous four-digit codes will become five digits under the new NOC 2021. It will also impact the eligibility criteria for all programs that use NOC. To prepare for these changes, you can learn the following in this article:

    Steps to find new NOC code 

    Step 1: Visit the National Occupational Classification (NOC) official website. 

    NOC 2021 and TEER

    Step 2: You can search by job title or NOC code on this page. If you want to search by job title, look for the “Version” section, then click on the box below it that says “NOC 2016 Version 1.3.” Then, it will open a drop-down menu and select the latest “NOC 2021 Version 1.3.”

    NOC 2021 and TEER

    Step 3: Once you select the new NOC 2021 version, enter your job title to find your NOC 2021 code and TEER category. 

    NOC 2021 and TEER

    Below is an example of a job titled Marketing Coordinator. You also view other matching job titles. 

    NOC 2021 and TEER


    Understanding New NOC categories

    All programs that previously used skill types or levels will now use NOC 2021 codes and TEER categories. 

    Most positions will remain in the TEER category, corresponding to the skill level in the table below. However, certain jobs may change to other TEER categories. The most significant change is the subdivision of Skill Level B jobs that will now become TEER 2 or TEER 3 jobs.

    The table below explains the distribution between skill types or levels and corresponding TEER categories. 

    NOC 2021 and TEER
    NOC 2021 and TEER

    Immigration Programs that new NOC will affect 

     Generally, all programs that have used NOC skill types or levels to invite applicants will be affected. Therefore, all the programs below will switch to using NOC 2021 codes and TEER levels. 

    Additionally, several occupations will become eligible and ineligible under specific programs due to the new NOC 2021 implementation. 

    Frequently Asked Questions regarding new TEER system

    Do you need to update your Express Entry profile as new NOC is implemented? 
    Suppose you are an Express Entry candidate who submitted your profile before November 16 but has not yet received an Invitation to Apply (ITA). Then, you must update your Express Entry profile with your new NOC 2021 code and TEER category. 

    If you receive an ITA before November 16, you can submit your Express Entry application using the NOC 2016 system. In addition, you can also refer to the NOC code mentioned on your ITA receipt and submit your application accordingly. However, there is no need for you to update to NOC 2021 if you received an ITA before November 16. 

    How will new NOC affect CRS scores? 
    The points distribution would be similar to what it has been with NOC 2016. Such as, so far, Express Entry applicants with arranged employment in Skill Levels 0, A and B have received 50 additional points. 

    With NOC 2021, applicants will receive 50 additional points for arranged employment provided their NOC is in TEER 0, 1, 2 or 3. 

    Similarly, you will continue to receive points for Canadian education. However, your work experience must be in occupations that are TEER 0, 1, 2 or 3. 

    How can you prepare for new NOC? 
    To be prepared, you can be mindful of the new changes in the TEER lead statements and primary duties. Although most duties may be similar, your work experience letter must reflect the duties mentioned in your new NOC 2021 code and TEER category. 

    Moreover, you must continue to match the duties in your NOC 2021 occupation if you want to claim points for the skilled experience inside and outside Canada. 


  • Moving To Canada – Know Free Pre-Arrival Services For Job & Settlement

    Moving to Canada and starting a new life here can be very overwhelming. Most newcomers have a lot of concerns about settling in a new country. And it is quite understandable. However, if you are a newcomer to Canada, don’t worry the government has got you covered.

    The Canadian government funds a lot of settlement agencies to make the transition easier for newcomers. These agencies provide pre-arrival settlement services to help newcomers adapt to a new country. Pre-arrival services are programs offered online or in person. These programs are free and help newcomers to better understand life in Canada.

    Also, some services can help you find a job. They can help you get your education or work experience recognized in Canada. Moreover, some programs provide you with specific information regarding your profession. This could include language training or essential skills training. 


    You may also like:


    Listed below are the organizations and how they can help you settle in Canada

    Active Engagement and Integration Project

    This project offers in-person services in China, and also online services globally, such as:

    • general information about living in Canada
    • orientation to education, health care, housing, and transportation in Canada
    • needs assessment
    • referrals to community services.
    Planning for Canada

    The program offers in-person services in India and the Philippines and also online services globally, including:

    • general information about living in Canada
    • orientation to education, health care, housing, and transportation in Canada
    • needs assessment
    • referrals to community services.
    Next Stop Canada

    This organization offers online services globally, including:

    • general information about living in Canada
    • orientation to education, health care, housing, and transportation in Canada
    • needs assessment
    • referrals to community services
    • specialized programming for youth between 12 to 19 years old, such as connections to youth mentors.
    Connexions Francophones

    This program offers in-person services in Morocco and online services globally. Moreover, if you want to live in a Francophone community in Canada, they can help you with:

    • information and orientation
    • connections with Francophone local organizations
    • needs assessment
    • a personalized settlement plan with other links to in-Canada resources.

    Organizations that help with career and job search

    Active Engagement and Integration Project (AEIP)

    This project offers online services globally. It helps you:

    • write your resume
    • prepare to work in Canada
    • get your credentials recognized
    • attend online job fairs to learn about potential employers.
    Canada InfoNet

    This organization offers online services globally to help you:

    • prepare for work
    • access employer-interactive webinars
    • access job matching platforms
    • find a mentor with experience in your sector
    • learn about Canadian workplace culture.
    Settlement Online Pre-Arrival (SOPA)

    This organization offers online services globally. They offer support such as:

    • online courses, including “Job Search Strategies” and “Working in Canada”
    • webinars
    • help for preparing to work in Canada.
    Connexions Francophones

    This program offers employment services to French-speaking newcomers wishing to settle in Francophone communities. Services include:

    • virtual job fairs in real-time with potential employers seeking French-speaking employees
    • how to prepare to work in Canada and also get your credentials recognized
    • webinars about mentoring, writing a resume, and Canadian workplace culture.
    BCCA Integrating Newcomers

    The British Columbia Construction Association Integrating Newcomers (BCCA-IN) program provides free one-on-one pre-arrival services to newcomers with a construction background. Services BCCA-IN offers are –  

    • skills assessment
    • job leads
    • accreditation advice
    • settlement services referrals.

    BCCA-IN supports architects, designers, project managers, estimators, engineers, tradespeople, and those in strategic business support groups

    BuildON

    This organization offers online services globally. If you plan on living in Ontario, BuildOn offers services that focus on:

    • construction
    • skilled trades
    • engineering.
    ACCES Employment: Canadian Employment Connections and Entrepreneurship Connections Pre-Arrival (CEC-ECP)

    This organization offers online services globally. They offer industry-specific job services, including one-on-one coaching, to help you:

    • prepare to look for jobs
    • prepare to work in Canada
    • learn about workplace culture.
    Global Onboarding of Talent Initiative (GO Talent)

    This initiative offers online services globally. They support newcomers from the information and technology sector to help you:

    • with sector-specific help
    • attend career events
    • find a job
    • get your credentials recognized.
    Integrating Newcomers

    This Canada-wide program offers pre-arrival employment support services to prepare newcomers for jobs in the construction industry, no matter what city, province, or territory you’re moving to.

    Professions supported include

    • tradespeople
    • engineers (in any discipline)
    • architects
    • technicians
    • technologists
    • Business support specialists.
    Pre-Arrival Supports and Services Program (PASS)

    This program helps nurses prepare to work in Canada’s healthcare field. PASS provides connections to sector-specific information including:

    • workplace practices in health care
    • mentoring with Canadian nurses
    • schools
    • the nursing registration process
    • regulatory bodies.

    Who is eligible?

    You can get these services, if:

    • Your permanent residence (PR) application has been approved.
    • You are currently living outside of Canada.
    • You have one of these documents:
      • letter saying you can get pre-arrival services
      • confirmation of permanent residence letter
      • a passport request letter that indicates permanent resident visa issuance
      • letter asking for your medical exam results
      • single-entry permanent resident visa
      • letter from us letting your know you can pick up your permanent resident visa