Know Eligibility Requirements For The Alberta Opportunity Stream

Alberta Opportunity Stream For PR: Know Full Eligibility!


The Alberta Opportunity Stream of Alberta Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) is for temporary foreign workers already working full-time in Alberta. Alberta renamed its PNP to AAIP (Alberta Advantage Immigration Program) in February 2022. Previously, AAIP was called Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP).

Currently, AAIP is assessing applications received before September 2, 2022. Furthermore, there are approximately 935 applications in queue. IRCC allocated 6,500 nominations to AAIP for 2022. Out of these, Alberta has already issued 5,837 nomination certificates so far.

This article enlists full eligibility requirements for Alberta Opportunity Stream focusing on:

Language requirements

When you submit your application, you must demonstrate that you have passed the following language tests in English or French. You must get the required points based on a single test result.

National Occupational Classification (NOC) Skill LevelCanadian Language Benchmark (CLB) test score requiredNiveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) test score required
If you are working in a TEER 0, 1, 2, or 3 (NOC 0, A or B) occupationMinimum of 5 for each English language skillMinimum of 5 for each French language skill
If you are working in a TEER 4 or 5 (NOC C or D) occupationMinimum of 4 for each English language skillMinimum of 4 for each French language skill

When your application is filed, official test results must be no more than two years old. The date you took the exam, not the date your test results were issued, is utilized to establish the age of your test findings. The AAIP will not accept enrollment confirmation for a language exam instead of a test result.

Occupation requirements

Eligible occupations

When you file your application, you must work in a qualifying occupation in Alberta at the time of your application evaluation. The occupation requirements apply to your work experience and a job offer.

In addition, most occupations in National Occupational Classification (NOC) TEER 0, 1, 2, or 3, 4, and 5 are eligible. 

Post-Graduation Work Permit holders

If you have a Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP), your occupation in Alberta must also be connected to your subject of study. See the education requirements section for further information on valid Alberta credentials and recognized Alberta institutions.

Suppose you began your Alberta credential program on or after April 1, 2019, and completed an Advanced Education-approved one-year post-diploma or post-baccalaureate certificate. In that case, your occupation must also be connected to your previous post-secondary field of study outside of Canada.



Ineligible occupations

Individuals employed in the occupations listed below at the time of submission and evaluation are ineligible to apply for or be nominated under the Alberta Opportunity Stream.

NOC Code (2021)NOC TEER categoryOccupation
000100Legislators
400210School principals and administrators of elementary and secondary education
400300Managers in social, community and correctional services
400410Fire chiefs and senior firefighting officers
60040*0Escort agency managers, massage parlour managers
411001Judges
412201Secondary school teachers
412211Elementary school and kindergarten teachers
511111Authors and writers (except technical)
511221Musicians and singers
42200*2Justices of the peace
42202*2Early childhood educators who do not have certification through Alberta Children’s Services – Child Care Staff Certification Office or who have been certified as Level 1 Early Childhood Educator (formerly Child Development Assistant)
431003Elementary and secondary school teacher assistants
431093Other instructors
531213Actors, comedians and circus performers
531223Painters, sculptors and other visual artists
531243Artisans and craftspersons
532003Athletes
631013Real estate agents and salespersons
33100*3Dental laboratory assistants/bench workers
441004Home child care providers
441014Home support workers, caregivers and related occupations
643214Casino occupations
551095Other performers
651095Other sales related occupations
652115Operators and attendants in amusement, recreation and sport
652295Other support occupations in personal services
653295Other service support occupations
752005Taxi and limousine drivers and chauffeurs
851015Harvesting labourers
851025Aquaculture and marine harvest labourers
851045Trappers and hunters
851105Mine labourers
851215Landscaping and grounds maintenance labourers

Work permit and residency requirements 

When you submit your application and the Alberta Advantage Immigration Program (AAIP) evaluates it, you must have a valid temporary resident status in Canada that allows you to work, i.e. a temporary foreign worker permit.

For work permits to be valid, they should meet one of the following criteria:

  • Have a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), or
  • An LMIA exemption for workers based on the following:
    • International trade agreements
    • workers transferred within a company
    • International Experience Canada
    • Mobilité Francophone
  • Have an IRCC-issued open work permit:
    • To vulnerable workers who demonstrate they are at risk of abuse or experiencing abuse in the content of their employment in Canada. It includes exemption under the Vulnerable Workers Open Work Permit (VWOWP)
    • Family members of a vulnerable worker who qualifies for the VWOWP exemption
  • a Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP) issued to a graduate of Alberta Advanced Education publicly funded post-secondary institution
    • PGWP holders must also fulfill the requirements of the occupation, education, and work experience.
  • An open work permit was granted following one of the IRCC’s open work permit public policies:
  • The permit must be held by an Alberta Advanced Education publicly funded post-secondary institution graduate. Following the temporary policy changes to the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program (PGWPP)
  • Other open work permit requirements:

Regarding requirements, candidates must have a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) or one of the accepted LMIA exemption work permits. Candidates must also fulfill additional minimum eligibility requirements for residency and work permit type, occupation, language, education, Alberta job offer, and work experience.

Ineligible applicants

The following individuals are not eligible to apply for or be nominated for the Alberta Opportunity Stream:

  • Individuals involved in a federal appeal or removal procedure – The AAIP does not intervene in federal refugee claims, appeals, or removal proceedings.
  • temporary residents of Canada living or working in a province or territory other than Alberta, or
  • Foreign nationals who live or work in Canada but do not have legal temporary residence status

If you apply to the AAIP under NOC code 33102 (nurse aides, orderlies, and patient service associates), you must have a CLB of 7 for each English language skill or an NCLC of 7 for each French language skill.

Education requirements

Except for Post-Graduation Work Permit holders, all candidates must have completed a minimum of high school education equal to Canadian standards when filing your application on January 1, 2021.

Applicant must provide a copy of an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) issued by an IRCC-approved organization for your highest level of education. You do not fulfill the education criterion if your ECA report reveals that your certificate is not equivalent to the completion of a Canadian high school or if the foreign educational institution is not recognized.

An ECA is not required if:

You have a valid Alberta Qualification Certificate, a trade certificate recognized by Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training, or a Canadian degree, diploma, or certificate from a recognized Canadian post-secondary, technical college, or secondary school (AIT).

Candidates who applied before January 1, 2021, had to have completed high school education in their country of origin. These candidates did not need an ECA.

Eligible work experience

When you submit your application, you must have either: 

  • 12 months of full-time job experience in your present occupation in Alberta during the previous 18 months, or
  • A minimum of 24 months of full-time work experience in your current occupation in Canada or overseas during the previous 30 months, or both – this work experience can be a combination of experience earned in Alberta, in Canada (outside of Alberta), or abroad.

Post-Graduation Work Permit holders must have a minimum of 6 months of full-time work experience in their current occupation in Alberta within the past 18 months.

Work experience in the qualifying period is required for all candidates, including those with a Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP).

  • full-time work experience for a minimum of 30 hours a week
  • Work experience in the same occupation as your current occupation 
  • Had a valid temporary resident status and IRCC-authorised work permit while working in Alberta or Canada. 
  • Work experience gained while studying does not count unless you were on a PGWP and completed a paid co-op work term as a part of your program of study at an Alberta post-secondary institution. The work term must have been:
    • Minimum of 30 hours per week, paid and full-time.  
    • Work experience directly relates to your current occupation and 
    • All work experience was gained in Alberta. 

All applicants, including PGWP holders, must complete the following license, registration, and certification requirement at the time your application is filed and the AAIP evaluates it:

  • To work in your present occupation in Alberta, you must have the necessary licensure, registration, or certification.
  • You must hold a valid Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Trade (AIT) approved trade certificate if you work in a required trade in Alberta.
  • If you work as a childcare worker, you must be certified as a Level 2 Early Childhood Educator (previously Child Development Worker) or Level 3 Early Childhood Educator (formerly Child Development Supervisor).

Source: Government of Alberta


  • Childcare In Canada – Here Is All You Need To Know!

    The journey might sound too overwhelming if you are getting permanent residency of Canada, starting a new life and have kids. As a parent, childcare is usually the top priority. Everyone wants to provide their child with the best care. However, it is also essential to manage the costs and ensure that the childcare service is top quality. 

    So, if you have a child or are planning on having one, you are in the right place. This article lists the many childcare options in Canada. Also, it helps you understand the costs so that you can plan your budget accordingly. Moreover, it will also help you choose a service that is best suited to your needs.

    Types of child care in Canada

    In Canada, there are many options available for child care. A few examples of these are – daycare centres, home daycare, nannies, and preschools. Some of the services are regulated while others might be unregulated.

    Regulated services are monitored, licensed, and regulated by provincial and territorial authorities. Examples of these are full-day childcare, home child care, and school-age child care.

    On the other hand, unregulated child care is provided either in the caregiver’s or the child’s own home. In such cases, it is the parent’s responsibility to assess the quality of child care provided.

    Moreover, you will have to manage your relationship with the caregiver. Listed below are the different kinds of child care in Canada – 

    childcare in canada

    Full-day child care centres

    These centres are inspected regularly by government officials. Full-day child care should be licensed and meet the province’s regulations. These include group size, staff training requirements, physical space, nutrition, health and safety, and so on.  Any childcare centre that is not licensed cannot operate anywhere in Canada.

    Part-day programs

    These programs are regulated in almost all provinces through the same licensing systems as full-day programs. However, some requirements may be different. Also, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, and Yukon allow unlicensed part-day programs. Examples of such programs are nursery schools or preschools.

    School-age programs

    These programs are regulated in all provinces, usually up to age 12. However, starting age and specific requirements for school-age programs vary. Some before and after-school programs, recreational and skill-building programs, as well as programs for young school-aged children during summers and school holidays are not required to be licensed

    Regulated family child care (home child care)

    This program is available in all provinces. It is provided to a group of children in a caregiver’s own home. In some provinces, regulated family childcare homes are inspected or monitored by a government official.

    They make regular visits. Some regulations in this program include the physical environment, number of children by age, record keeping, nutrition, health and safety, and also sometimes caregiver training.



    Cost of childcare in Canada

    Child care is expensive in Canada and varies by province. So, it often becomes a challenge to find affordable child care. The monthly cost can be around $179 to $1,934 CAD depending on the province.

    In Quebec, Prince Edward Island, Manitoba, and Newfoundland, and Labrador half of the childcare spaces are at a provincially-set fee. Child care in Toronto is the most expensive.

    Also, Markham, Mississauga, Oakville, Richmond Hill, and Vaughan, all cities in the GTA (Greater Toronto Area) follow with the highest median fees for childcare. The cities with the lowest fees for infant care are in Quebec. Winnipeg also has affordable childcare. 

    How to find a perfect childcare option 

    Listed below are the steps you should take to find childcare that best suits your situation – 

    • Search for Child Care Services in your city. You can find them on your city’s website or the province’s Ministry of Education website. This will provide you with a list of licensed centers in your neighborhood.
    • Choose the location that best suits for based on your work location or home. Ask about their hours of operation. See if they match the days and times when you’ll need childcare
    • Check the environment of the childcare. It should be welcoming, safe, and child friendly. 
    • Confirm that the provider is licensed, regulated, or monitored by the government. Confirm their qualifications. See if the staff is trained in providing emergency first aid.
    • Lastly, ask about the fees and see if it fits your budget. 

    Tips for newcomers to Canada

    Here are a few tips for newcomers- 

    Budgeting – It is important to budget your expenses. Note down all your monthly costs. This will help you better plan your finances and choose the right kind of childcare program. Also, this helps you decide if you should go for private or public care. For example, hiring a nanny may prove to be slightly more cost-effective if you have two or more kids. 

    Grants – The federal government offers Canada Child Benefit to families with children. This grant provides a tax-free monthly payment to all eligible families living in Canada to assist with the cost of raising children under the age of 18. You should apply for these grants. 

    Subsidies – All provinces provide childcare subsidies. However, the criteria, limits, and options may vary depending on the province. You should consider this. You can Reach out to your nearest newcomer settlement centre for assistance.


  • Recommendations To Improve Canada Immigration Made By CIMM

    The Canadian House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration (CIMM) released a report, Promoting Fairness in Canada Immigration Decisions, where the Committee investigated visa outcomes in the immigration system. Upon examination, they found the system systematically and unjustifiably disfavours particular groups based on race and country of origin.

    As a result, the Committee makes wide-ranging suggestions to improve the immigration system, which consistently disadvantages some groups depending on race and country of origin.

    After hearing from several immigration advocates, lawyers, and settlement agency staff, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration decided to examine the immigration system. 



    CIMM’s Key recommendations for the immigration system 

    IRCC will share their response to the CIMM report and recommendations in a few months. Meanwhile, below are the key recommendations:

    • Visa officers should record applicant interviews to prevent miscommunication.
    • Ottawa should expand the extraordinary measures already available to Ukrainians, such as the provision allowing for the sponsorship of extended family members to people from other nations and regions experiencing humanitarian crises.
    • The Canadian government should establish a separate monitoring body responsible for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), whose mandate should include dealing with racism and complaints concerning the agency. 
    • Immediate implementation of an Anti-Racism Quality Assurance process for decisions made by visa officers to investigate the impact of individual bias and systemic racism on decisions and refusal rates at visa offices
    • Requesting that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) dedicate more resources to process caregiver permanent residency applications from all streams faster. 

    As per IRCC, they train all officers to assess all applications equally and use the same criteria regardless of their country of origin. With the upcoming reports, they are looking to examine the impact on racialized applicants and minority community members. 

    CIMM highlights longer wait times in application processing 

    According to the Committee’s information, waiting for durations for various refugee groups may differ depending on shifting government priorities and quotas.

    A non-denominational charitable group called Remember Ministries’ executive director, Jennifer Miedema informed the Committee that fund allocation tells you where priorities are placed or who are the favoured demographics.

    Miedema says that “the uneven distribution of delays equals the uneven distribution of suffering,” adding that even holding out hope for final resettlement could be harmful over a prolonged period of waiting and delay.

    Further, she explains the impact on refugees, as their hopes are raised when they submit their applications, but they need to wait for a year or two without any response. As a result, it has a heavy impact on their mental health. 

    According to the Parliamentary Committee, the government should raise the overall number of refugees it welcomes to Canada during a crisis rather than backtrack on or delay receiving those whose applications are currently on hold. 

    They also want a complete racial equity assessment of Canada’s immigration and refugee system and to allocate more resources to process and give priority to privately sponsored refugees. 

    An increasing number of federal appeals 

    The number of people requesting federal appeals to become new Canadians has increased seven times in the last three years. 

    The court system is becoming overburdened with these judicial requests to contest allegedly unjust decisions made by visa officers and procedural delays. These applications are a judicial remedy in the immigration context that compels the IRCC to carry out a public legal obligation owed to an applicant.

    The recording of candidate interviews has been recommended as a potential solution to help with court-ordered redeterminations of unsuccessful applications. According to Vancouver-based immigration lawyer Victor Ing, IRCC needs to be more transparent and honest with clients to avoid more mandamus applications.

    Next, the Committee highlighted the increased wait times in the caregiver program. 

    The caregiver Program has the longest wait times

    The Live-in Caregiver Program saw some of the longest wait times before and after the pandemic. For example, the average time to process caregiver visas in 2020 was about 57 months and two days. While in 2021, the wait time was 68 months plus one day to process applications. 

    As a result, 15,621 applications were pending or anticipated to be pending in the Home Child-Care Provider Pilot backlog as of December 31, 2021. In addition, there were 1,639 more applications in the Live-in Care Program’s database.

    Arlene Ruiz, a licensed and regulated immigration consultant and a recruiter from Alexene Immigration & Employment Services, informed the Committee that many caregivers are from the Philippines. For them, the delays in application processing cause breakdowns in their marriages and children growing out of their dependent status. 

    Immigration attorney Steven Meurrens also mentions that the IRCC lacks transparency, which adds to the problem. For example, the processing times mentioned on IRCC are inaccurate. Further, the Access to Information Act shows that there have been no caregiver files processed since 2019.

    Following this month’s announcement by the federal Minister of Immigration, Sean Fraser, that Canada aims to settle 500,000 new immigrants by 2025, a new report by the Parliament has been released.

    The announcement comes after a record-breaking year for immigration to Canada in 2021, when more than 405,000 people arrived. The nation is also dealing with an unprecedented backlog of visa applications, with 2.2 million being processed by IRCC as of this month.

    Source: CIMM Report


  • Know Latest Average Weekly Earnings In Canada & All The Provinces

    On November 24, 2022 – Statistics Canada released September 2022 data for average weekly earnings in Canada and all provinces. Due to administrative steps that lead to the collection and compilation of data from our widely dispersed Canada, this data is typically delayed by two months.

    In September 2022, the number of employees receiving pay or benefits from their employer increased by 85,300 (+0.5%), according to the Survey of Employment, Payrolls, and Hours. Average weekly earnings in Canada is at $1,175.37, an increase of 3.5% year-on-year.

    Overall, the payroll employment were largest in Quebec (+39,100; +1.0%), Ontario (+15,300; +0.2%), British Columbia (+10,500; +0.4%) and Alberta (+10,400; +0.5%). The only province to see a decrease in payroll employment was Newfoundland and Labrador (-900; -0.4%).

    Overall, average weekly earnings increased by 3.5% year on year in September 2022, slightly higher than the 3.2% increase in August. Below are the province-wise and industry-wise weekly earnings as per Statistics Canada.

    Industry-Wise Weekly Earnings in Canada (Including overtime) – September 2022

    IndustryAverage Weekly Earnings
    Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction2304.44
    Utilities1927.56
    Finance and insurance1724.12
    Professional, scientific and technical services1639.86
    Information and cultural industries1621.54
    Public administration1532.19
    Management of companies and enterprises1493.67
    Construction1456.61
    Forestry, logging and support1411.59
    Wholesale trade1399.45
    Manufacturing1248.50
    Transportation and warehousing1226.55
    Real estate and rental and leasing1204.10
    Sector aggregate1175.37
    Educational services1145.01
    Health care and social assistance1016.67
    Other services (excluding public administration)981.10
    Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services952.89
    Arts, entertainment and recreation729.04
    Retail trade704.73
    Accommodation and food services468.30


    Province-Wise Weekly Earnings in Canada

    GeographyWeekly Earnings Sep 2022Weekly Earnings Aug 2022
    Nunavut$1593.33$1559.50
    Northwest Territories$1560.30$1552.27
    Yukon$1334.02$1348.75
    Alberta$1266.05$1257.16
    Ontario$1206.70$1198.79
    British Columbia$1175.98$1170.23
    Newfoundland and Labrador$1159.31$1145.71
    Saskatchewan$1155.70$1143.55
    Quebec$1118.25$1120.40
    New Brunswick$1082.99$1066.62
    Manitoba$1066.67$1070.27
    Nova Scotia$1020.83$1027.02
    Prince Edward Island$985.73$975.54

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Which Canadian province has the highest average weekly earnings?

    Nunavut has the highest weekly earnings at $1593.33 followed by Northwest Territories at $1560.30 and Yukon at $1334.02. However, these provinces have very low population being in the northern Canada.

    Alberta has the average weekly earnings of $1266.05 among the major Canadian provinces followed by Ontario at $1206.70 and British Columbia at $1175.98.

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Canada?

    Canada has the average weekly earnings of $1,175.37 as per latest data by Statistics Canada released on November 24, 2022.

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Ontario and British Columbia?

    Ontario has the average weekly earnings of $1206.70, while British Columbia has average weekly earnings at $1175.98

    How much is the average weekly earnings in Quebec?

    Quebec has an average weekly earnings of $1118.25

    Source: Statistics Canada


  • CBSA Administrative Jobs Hiring Now For Calgary & Edmonton Airport

    Canada Border Services Agency is hiring for various admin jobs in Central Alberta District, Calgary International Airport (Alberta) and Edmonton International Airport (Alberta). 

    The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the second-largest law enforcement agency in Canada, employs over 15,000 individuals across the country and works around the clock to defend Canada’s borders by obstructing the entry of high-risk people and commodities while facilitating legal trade and travel.

    To apply for this position, all you need is a two years of secondary school. Learn about the position details, requirements and how to apply. 

    Employment conditions 

    • Must have a Reliability Status for security clearance
    • Hold a valid driver’s license or personal mobility 
    • Can operate a government vehicle.
    • Be able to take job-related travel with advance notice
    • Can work various shifts, such as evenings and weekends
    • Be able to work overtime and on weekends, including statutory holidays.
    • Have the ability to carry up to 25 kg


    Position Requirements

    Education: The applicant must have completed two years of secondary school “OR” other employer-approved alternatives as listed below. 

    The employer-approved alternative includes the following: 

    • A satisfactory result on the test given by the Public Service Commission, which is accepted as a substitute for two years of secondary education; or
    • An acceptable balance of experience, training, and education

    Candidates are considered to have completed the two years of secondary school if they satisfy one of the following requirements:

    • Candidates who passed the Public Service Commission exam, which is accepted as a substitute for two years of high school; or
    • Candidates who have been assigned or deployed to a position in the CR classification for an indefinite period

    Experience: Candidates must have experience providing administrative support in an office setting. For example, buying office supplies, receiving supplies, entering data, managing communications, preserving documents, etc. As well as have experience offering client service to both external and internal clients.

    Job Summary? 

    All you need is your résumé and two references to apply for these positions. You would have to create your candidate profile and fill out your details. Additionally, ensure that you demonstrate how you meet the position requirements in your application. 

    Who Can Apply:

    Anyone living in Calgary, Alberta, and surrounding locations, such as Standard, Cayley, Exshaw, and Didsbury, AB, is welcome to apply for the Calgary position.  

    Additionally, those residing in Leduc (AB) and close-by locations such as Legal (AB), Ryley (AB), Ponoka (AB), and Breton (AB) can apply for the Edmonton position. 

    • Salary: $50,821 to $54,857
    • Closing date: 31 December 2022 – 23:59, Pacific Time

    To apply for the Calagary position, click here. The reference number for this position is BSF22J-016272-003382. 

    If you would like to apply for the Edmonton position, click here. The reference number for this position is BSF22J-016272-003380. 


  • India Issues New Travel Guidelines For International Arrivals-Nov 22

    New Travel Guidelines For International Arrivals: The Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare issued newly updated guidelines for international arrivals to India effective from November 22, 2022. The new guidelines are in light of declining Covid-19 cases and significant progress in Covid-19 vaccination coverage worldwide and in India.

    Updated guidelines apply to all international travellers entering by air, port or land borders. This article enlists the summary of the new guidelines that come into effect today, and remain valid until further notice. 

    india new travel guidelines

    Summary of updated guidelines for travellers to India

    The guidelines below are divided into three stages: the pre-arrival and planning stage, the guidelines to follow during in-flight travel, and the last on arrival to India. 

    Pre-arrival-when planning to travel to India 

    All travellers should ideally be completely vaccinated under their country’s primary immunization program approved against Covid-19. 

    In-flight travel-while travelling to India

    There will be in-flight announcements about the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and instructions on staying safe throughout the flight and at all ports of entry. Passengers are to continue to take precautionary measures by wearing masks and keeping physical distance to stay safe. 

    In addition, if any passenger exhibits symptoms of Covid-19 while travelling may be separated under the established protocol. It requires wearing a mask, isolation and segregation from other passengers during flight travel, and transfer to an isolation centre for further care. 

    On arrival in India 

    While de-boarding, the passengers must maintain physical distancing. Health officials at the port of entry may check all passengers for thermal screening. Moreover, if a passenger shows symptoms during their screening, they shall be isolated immediately and taken to a designated medical facility as required by health protocol. 

    Lastly, all passengers should self-monitor their health after arrival. Then, in case of symptoms, they can contact their nearest health facility or call the national helpline number 1075 or the state helpline number.  

    We will continue to monitor and share any updates and developments regarding the new or updated travel guidelines for international travellers to India. 




  • VIA Rail Jobs Hiring Now For Toronto And Montreal Locations

    VIA Rail Canada is hiring for On-Train Service Attendants for Toronto and Montreal Terminals. It is an excellent opportunity for people with experience in hospitality, food restaurants, or airline companies and looking for entry level jobs.

    The position requires customer service, such as greeting people on board, answering their needs and showing sincere appreciation for their business. The job pays $26.26 per hour. 

    What’s more? You even get paid training along with several benefits. Learn about the position details, requirements and how to apply below. 

    Position Summary for Toronto candidates

    • Job Title: On-Train Service Attendant 
    • Job Category: Customer Service 
    • Hourly Rate: $26.26
    • Number of positions to fill: 12
    • Application deadline: November 30, 2022

    Position Summary for Montreal candidates

    • Job Title: On-Train Service Attendant 
    • Job Category: Customer Service 
    • Hourly Rate: $26.26
    • Number of positions to fill: 12
    • Application deadline: December 2, 2022


    Benefits

    • Competitive $26.26 hourly rate
    • generous pay and benefits package
    • Paid training 
    • A supportive and close group of coworkers 
    • A workplace that promotes employee health and happiness
    • Employees and their families can take advantage of various health and wellness benefits, including complete telemedicine service.
    • An employer who values equity and offers possibilities for advancement
    • An opportunity to be a part of a sustainable transportation service that connects Canadian communities.

    The paid training sessions begin on January 16, 2023, and last approximately seven weeks. You must complete the training session successfully to obtain the position. 

    Travel requirements

    If you apply to work in Montreal Terminal as an On-Train Service Attendant, you may need to travel to Ottawa, Toronto, Quebec City, Jonquière and Senneterre.

    Similarly, if you apply to work in Toronto Terminal, you would have to travel from Toronto to Windsor, Niagara and Montreal. 

    Responsibilities and duties

    As an On-Train Service Attendant, some of your daily duties will include the following: 

    • Ensure that every traveller receives exceptional, professional service.
    • Provide safety instructions 
    • Escort passengers on their journey and help them with their luggage
    • Offer, provide and serve food and drinks, including meat and alcohol. 
    • Sell refreshments and snacks 
    • Maintain the cleanliness of the work areas and the restrooms.
    • During each journey, pay attention to the little things.

    Job schedule 

    The position requires you to travel, and below is how much you may need to travel:  

    • On-call schedules that are variable, including weekends and holidays (bonuses for statutory holidays)
    • Away from home travel for each trip where each trip may last for one to three days 
    • Long-distance trips include accommodation and meals.

    Job Requirements

    To be eligible for this position, you have to meet the following requirements: 

    • Greet customers and can communicate in English and French 
    • Hold a high school diploma. 
    • Possess the physical ability to repeatedly handle loads of up to 23 kg (50 lb.). 
    • Have at least one year of customer service experience, preferably in the food service industry, restaurant, or as a flight attendant for an airline

    How to apply? 

    To apply, you must create an account using your email if you are a new candidate. Then, fill out your details such as identification, contact information, educational background, experience, availability, language ability and position questionnaire. 


  • Canada Work Culture – Know How To Adapt As A Newcomer!

    As a newcomer to Canada, it is common to face challenges in adapting to a new culture. Most immigrants bring valuable knowledge and skills to the Canadian market. But they are hesitant in applying to jobs. So, if you are new to Canada and are facing challenges in starting or advancing your career, don’t worry we have got you covered. 

    Often these challenges are because you might be unaware of the differences between the work environment in your home country and in Canada. This can be in regard to networking, communication, feedback, and so on.

    As a newcomer, it is important to familiarize yourself with the Canadian work culture. This will not only help you to work well in a team but will also help you grow your career. Also, this helps avoid any misunderstanding. 

    So, take some time and adopt these tips to adapt to the Canadian work culture:

    1. Focus on your Soft Skills

    The Canadian work culture focuses a lot on your soft skills. Having soft skills means being able to work in a team, being flexible, and having good time management practices. Also, it is important that you have a positive attitude. Always take initiative in your team. Canadian work culture often values these skills more than your “hard skills”. 

    2. Small talks

    Small talks is integral to Canadian culture. This applies to your workplace as well. So, always indulge in small talk in your meetings. It helps you know other people and understand any common interests that you may have. Some common topics for small talk could be weather, sports, or movies.


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    3. Punctuality

    Canadians value punctuality and time management a lot. Most people here don’t wait for more than 15 minutes if you’re late. It is considered disrespectful to keep people waiting. However, if you are running late, always send people a message. Let them know when they should expect you.

    If you are late to work regularly, you might be perceived as unprofessional. Also, it raises concerns about your time management skills Most workplaces have policies around punctuality and attendance. Make sure to follow them. By doing so, you can advance in the company.

    4. Equality

    Canadian workplaces pay a lot of emphasis on equality. People here are treated equally and fairly. People’s designation doesn’t determine respect. Even if you are an intern, you will be included in meetings and asked to share your views. Canadian workplaces are very diverse. Discrimination on the basis of age, gender, sexual orientation, or race is illegal. So, it is very important for you to appreciate and respect diversity and cultural differences. 

    5. Understand the non-verbal cues

    It is very important for you to understand the non-Verbal and subtle Cues in your workplace. You should try to learn and adopt these. A few examples of these are- maintaining eye contact during a conversation. This shows that you are interested in the conversation. Avoiding eye contact comes across as being untrustworthy, or having low self-confidence. Say good morning and goodbye at the end of the workday. These small gestures can go a long way. 


  • Manitoba PNP Skilled Worker Overseas: Know Full Eligibility 

    Under Manitoba’s provincial nominee programs, one of the streams is the Skilled Workers Overseas (SWO) stream. Manitoba uses point assessments to determine your eligibility for the Skilled Workers Overseas (SWO) stream.

    Recent MPNP draw on November 18, sent 143 Letters of Advice to Apply (LAAs) to Skilled Worker Overseas applicants having a score of 686 or above, under a Strategic Recruitment Initiative. This article delves into detailed eligibility criteria and points calculation for MPNP Skilled Workers Overseas stream.

    Point Calculation for Skilled Workers Overseas Stream

    To be considered for the Skilled Worker Overseas stream, candidates must obtain at least 60 points based on five characteristics and prove a strong connection to Manitoba. You are not eligible for this stream if you don’t have a connection to Manitoba, regardless of your point total. 

    The MPNP points distribution shown below is intended for self-evaluation and information. MPNP will do a detailed assessment of any application received and assign a score to each candidate based on the information and supporting evidence you give at the time, as well as the current eligibility criteria and information, policy, and procedure provided on this website. 



    Language Proficiency

    Language Points are awarded based on documentary evidence of training and proficiency in one or both of Canada’s official languages, English and French. If you are fluent in both, use the one you are most comfortable with as your first language. 

    As confirmation of your language proficiency, you must provide the official results of a recent MPNP-approved language test. Your test results must not be more than two years old before the day you submit your MPNP Online application to be considered. 

    Applicants whose occupations are classed as National Occupational Classification C or D must have at least CLB 4 in English to be able to apply (or NCLC 4 in French).

    Age

    The MPNP calculates age points based on the date your application is received.

    Work Experience

    Work experience points are awarded based on documented evidence of full-time employment in the previous five years. Only full-time positions of continuous six months or longer are considered.

    Education

    You must provide proof of completion of education or training programs at recognized educational institutions to earn education points. 

    A program is considered completed when you have completed all requirements and acquired a certificate, diploma, or degree. However, the MPNP reserves the right to seek a third-party review to verify that trades education and training meet Canadian standards.

    Adaptability

    Adaptability points are calculated based on documented proof of a strong connection to Manitoba. In addition, it considers employability in your evaluated occupation, proving that you have the genuine intention and ability to effectively settle and economically establish in Manitoba.

    All applicants must have a Manitoba connection. Even if numerous connections apply to you, you can only receive points for one. 

    In addition to Adaptability points, you may also receive Regional Immigration points if you have a connection to, and want to settle in, a region of Manitoba other than Winnipeg. Regional points are only supplemental and cannot be used in place of another connection to the province.

    All candidates who indicate that they intend to settle outside of Winnipeg must demonstrate, at the time of application, that they have a valid connection to a region outside of Winnipeg. Additionally, the applicant must indicate a strong likelihood that they will make a long-term economic contribution to that region.

    It is important to note that Manitoba PNP Skilled Workers Overseas nominate candidates who have demonstrated an established connection to Manitoba. The established connection can be through one of the following:

    • Support from family members or friends
    • Prior education or work experience in the province
    • Have a direct Invitation to Apply from the MPNP as a part of a Strategic Recruitment Initiative.

    Who is ineligible to apply for Skilled Workers Overseas Stream?

    The following are ineligible to apply to the MPNP:

    • Individuals involved in federal appeals or removals, as well as refugees,
    • Live-in caregivers who live in Canada currently
    • Temporary foreign workers who are now working and living in a province other than Manitoba
    • Canadian citizens and permanent residents’ spouses
    • Individuals who have been denied by the MPNP in the last six months and are unable to address the reasons for refusal
    • Individuals with an active immigration application in any other provincial or federal immigration program in Canada
      • Remember that having an Express Entry profile is not considered the same as an immigration application.

    Source: Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP)


  • Here Are 10 Work From Home Jobs Hiring Now In Canada!

    Whether you are an experienced professional or trying to build up experience, there is plenty of work from home opportunities. You can make several extra bugs from the comfort of your home, and many even offer you the flexibility to choose your schedule. 

    Below are ten work-from-home opportunities, regardless of your experience levels. All you need is a reliable internet connection and your laptop. 

    Moreover, you can find positions that will probably pay you weekly due to the nature of these jobs. We have included the average base salary from Indeed data to help you calculate your estimated salary. 

    10 Work-from-home Jobs with Average Base Salaries  

    Translator

    Average Base Salary: $27.06/hr

    Main duties: Translators take a message written in one language and convert it into another. They translate while keeping the original message’s meaning intact.

    Proofreader

    Average Base Salary: $24.16/hr

    Main duties: Proofreaders examine written material and fix grammatical and spelling mistakes. Additionally, they look for good syntax, punctuation, and brand voice.

    Virtual Assistant

    Average base salary: $22.11/hr

    Main duties: Virtual assistants manage calendars for their clients, which could include scheduling meetings, calls, travel plans, etc. In addition, they frequently connect with their client through phone and email.



    Content writer

    Average base salary: 21.49/hr

    Main duties: Content writers create marketing copy to promote their client’s services or goods. In addition, they conduct research to learn more about their client’s services and goods and input their material into a content management system for evaluation. 

    Transcriptionist

    Average base salary: 21.34/hr

    Main duties: A transcriptionist listens to audio files and notes each word they hear. In addition to reviewing and organizing their transcriptions for later access, they frequently write shorthand notes. 

    Blogger

    Average base salary: 21.19/hr

    Main duties: Bloggers create online blog content and get paid for views. For example, they create blog posts, edit them for clarity and grammatical accuracy, and publish them. Or they help write content for other blogs. In addition, bloggers use social media to advertise their blog posts. 

    Interpreter

    Average Base Salary: 20.93/hr

    Main duties: An interpreter translates a message or document from one language into another. They translate these messages into other languages and frequently into sign language for hearing-impaired people. Written documents can be translated into another language by interpreters as well.

    Social media handler

    Average base salary: 19.95/hr

    Main duties: Social media experts create content for a company’s social media platforms. In addition, they may need to engage with customers to expand the company’s social media following. Social media experts may also review websites and social media stats to enhance their tactics.

    Customer service representative

    Average base salary: $18.45/hr 

    Main duties: Customer service representatives take customer calls and solve their problems. In addition, they respond to customer inquiries, provide product details, and handle exchanges and returns.

    Call center representative

    Average base salary: 18.23/hr

    Main duties: Call centre agents to speak with customers and utilize their familiarity with goods and services to serve them better. They pay attention to customers’ complaints and work to understand their needs better to offer the best solution.


  • New Immigration Plan Can Help With Alberta Labour Shortage

    As Canada intends to significantly increase the number of immigrants annually, groups in Alberta believe it will benefit businesses facing labour shortages. The immigration levels plan, which immigration minister Sean Fraser unveiled on November 1, 2022, calls for a massive influx of immigrants to enter the country: 465,000 in 2023, rising to 500,000 in 2025.

    Government has a strong focus on admitting people based on their employment qualifications or experience. Alberta-based organizations want the government to ease limitations on immigrants choosing lower-paying positions and to support organizations that assist newcomers’ resettlement in ensuring that the new Canadians can genuinely help with the labour shortage.



    Calgary Chamber of Commerce Report on Immigration 

    The Calgary Chamber of Commerce released a report outlining the crucial role immigration plays in easing labour shortages. 

    President and CEO of the Calgary Chamber of Commerce, Deborah Yedlin, explained that whether you work in the service industry, technology, energy, or the healthcare industry, everyone is searching for that last unit of labour. Immigration has become important to address the talent shortage that every business faces across the country.

    Regarding the latest immigration levels plan, Yedlin accepts the new plan but suggests expanding the options to low-wage workers rather than solely focusing on highly skilled, technically trained experts. 

    According to Yedlin, there is a bit of a catch-22 with programs like the Alberta Opportunity Stream since you require prior work experience and language proficiency, which limits the pool of immigrants who can apply.

    She explains that the government needs to figure out how to ensure that the ability to come and work is offered as an opportunity for a broader proportion of the immigrant population than it already is, including low-wage workers.

    Affordable housing to attract immigrants

    According to Randy Boissonault, a member of parliament for Edmonton Centre, Alberta’s lower cost of living can draw people.

    Since all of the communities in Alberta have done an excellent job of continuing to create housing, Edmonton and Calgary are at the top of the list for affordable housing nationwide, according to Boissonault.

    He anticipates that the hundreds of thousands of newcomers will be able to fill employment gaps in the IT industry.

    On meeting the Alberta Machine Institute in the heart of Edmonton, they told Boissonault that many of their partners are searching for computer scientists and mathematicians who can significantly advance the field of machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    The provincial government oversees a program whose objective is to hasten the processing of visas for foreign workers hired by IT firms in Alberta.

    Yedlin claimed that because Albertans frequently lack the qualifications required for a position, businesses are forced to rely heavily on immigration. She emphasizes the tech positions that have remained unfilled for a considerable time despite being advertised for months in Calgary. 

    Newcomer settlement organizations need more support.

    Rispah Tremblay, senior manager of settlement services at the Edmonton Mennonite Centre for Newcomers (EMCN), which assists newcomers in settling in the capital area, said the immigration levels plan presents some difficulties for other organizations.

    Such that with increasing numbers, newcomer settlement organizations need additional resources, explained Tremblay. 

    Tremblay says that EMCN would require additional funding to pay employees who handle cases, assist clients in finding housing, and teach languages.

    New immigrants might not be able to integrate into the Canadian workforce without the assistance of the staff members who assist newcomers with their settlement needs.

    There must be an additional help to settle and get the right training or support they need as soon as they get here, she said. It will allow them to integrate and start working immediately.

    Tremblay is also worried that the housing supply would start to run out with everyone migrating here. Although she hasn’t heard anything from the federal government on funding to support service expansion, she anticipates that discussions will begin in the spring.


  • Manitoba PNP Draw Sent 518 New Invites For PR-November 18

    November 18, 2022 – Today, Manitoba PNP draw (MPNP) sent 518 Letters of Advice to Apply (LAA) under three different categories of its provincial nominee program. Most of the LAAs; 198 sent to International Education Stream (IES). 

    177 Letters of Advice to Apply (LAA) were sent to Skilled Workers In Manitoba (SWM) having a cut off score of 797. This cut off score increased by 184 points as compared to previous MPNP draw. Lowest cut off score was 459 in January 2022 MPNP draw.

    Additionally, 143 LAAs went to Skilled Worker Overseas applicants having a score of 686 or above, under a Strategic Recruitment Initiative. This cut off reduced by 40 points as compared to last MPNP Draw. Out of 518 LAAs, 125 were issued to the valid Express Entry profiles (FSW, FST, or CEC candidates).



    Skilled Workers in Manitoba

    This category offers permanent residency to individuals who demonstrate that a Manitoba company has offered them a long-term, full-time job. This job offer needs to be after they have completed at least six months (continuous) full-time employment with that company as a temporary foreign worker or international student working graduate.

    Self-employed individuals, business owners, owner-operators and individuals providing services as independent contractors are not eligible.

    If you graduated from a post-secondary program in another Canadian province, must first have been working for a Manitoba employer for at least one year before applying.

    International Education Stream:

    • The Graduate Internship Pathway which need a doctoral or master’s degree program from Manitoba in the last 3 years. But, job offer is not mandatory.
    • The Career Employment Pathway which needs to be graduated in the past 3 years from a DLI. But, 1-year full time job offer is required.
    • The International Student Entrepreneur Pilot which needs a full-time post-secondary program from Manitoba. It must be at least two years in duration. It requires the applicant to be 51% owner in a Manitoban business and actively working as a senior manager for last 6 months before applying.

    Language proficiency of CLB 7 is required to apply.

    Skilled Workers Overseas:

    To apply under this category, candidates must demonstrate an established connection to Manitoba through:

    • the support of family members or friends
    • previous education or work experience in the province
    • an Invitation to Apply received directly from the MPNP as part of a Strategic Recruitment Initiative.

    Apart from this, you must score at least 60 points based on the five selection factors.

    Click here to calculate your score.

    Who cannot apply to the Manitoba PNP?

    THE FOLLOWING ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO SUBMIT AN APPLICATION TO THE MPNP:
    • Refugee claimants, or individuals involved in a federal appeal or removal process
    • Live-in Caregivers currently living in Canada
    • Temporary foreign workers currently working and residing in a province other than Manitoba
    • Spouses of Canadian citizens or permanent residents
    • Individuals who have been refused by the MPNP within the last six months and who are not able to address the reason(s) for refusal

    How to Apply for Manitoba PNP:

    Manitoba PNP does not necessarily requires an Express Entry profile, but need an Expression of Interest to be submitted with Manitoba. If you are eligible under one of the above mentioned programs, then click here to create an Expression of Interest with Manitoba.


  • Saskatchewan PNP-List of Ineligible Occupations With New NOC Codes

    New TEER codes have now replaced the old NOC system effective November 16, 2022. All the provincial nominee programs (PNP) in Canada will also be following the new NOC system. We will be updating all the changes with new TEER system affecting PNPs.

    Saskatchewan Provincial Nominee Program known as Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) has a list of excluded occupations for the Express Entry Category and the Occupations In-Demand Category. People with these occupations are not eligible to apply for these categories of SINP.

    NOC TEER 4 (occupations that typically require a high school diploma or job-specific training) and NOC TEER 5 (occupations that typically require on-the-job training) skill levels are ineligible for the Occupation In-Demand and Express Entry subcategories.



    Below is the list of 152 occupations with new TEER codes that are ineligible for SINP

    NOC
    (TEER)
    OccupationTitle
    00010Legislators
    00011Senior government managers and officials
    00014Senior managers – trade, broadcasting and other services
    10019Other administrative services managers
    11100Financial auditors and accountants
    11103Securities agents, investment dealers and brokers
    12104Employment insurance and revenue officers
    12201Insurance adjusters and claims examiners
    12203Assessors, business valuators and appraisers
    13200Customs, ship and other brokers
    14103Court clerks and related court services occupations
    21100Physicists and astronomers
    21102Geoscientists and oceanographers
    21103Meteorologists and climatologists
    21109Other professional occupations in physical sciences
    21111Forestry professionals
    21201Landscape architects
    21202Urban and land use planners
    21332Petroleum engineers
    21390Aerospace engineers
    NOC
    (TEER)
    OccupationTitle
    30010Managers in health care
    31100Specialists in clinical and laboratory medicine
    31101Specialists in surgery
    31102General practitioners and family physicians
    31103Veterinarians
    31110Dentists
    31111Optometrists
    31112Audiologists and speech-language pathologists
    31120Pharmacists
    31121Dietitians and nutritionists
    31202Physiotherapists
    31204Kinesiologists and other professional occupations in therapy and assessment
    31209Other professional occupations in health diagnosing and treating
    31300Nursing coordinators and supervisors
    31301Registered nurses and registered psychiatric nurses
    31302Nurse practitioners
    31303Physician assistants, midwives and allied health professionals
    31303Physician assistants, midwives and allied health professionals
    32100Opticians
    32101Licensed practical nurses
    32103Respiratory therapists, clinical perfusionists and cardiopulmonary technologists
    32104Animal health technologists and veterinary technicians
    32109Other technical occupations in therapy and assessment
    32110Denturists
    32111Dental hygienists and dental therapists
    32200Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists
    32201Massage therapists
    32209Other practitioners of natural healing
    40010Government managers – health and social policy development and program administration
    40011Government managers – economic analysis, policy development and program administration
    40012Government managers – education policy development and program administration
    40019Other managers in public administration
    40021School principals and administrators of elementary and secondary education
    40040Commissioned police officers and related occupations in public protection services
    40040Commissioned police officers and related occupations in public protection services
    40041Fire chiefs and senior firefighting officers
    40042Commissioned officers of the Canadian Armed Forces
    41100Judges
    41101Lawyers and Quebec notaries
    NOC
    (TEER)
    OccupationTitle
    41201Post-secondary teaching and research assistants
    41220Secondary school teachers
    41221Elementary school and kindergarten teachers
    41301Therapists in counselling and related specialized therapies
    41302Religious leaders
    41310Police investigators and other investigative occupations
    41310Police investigators and other investigative occupations
    41311Probation and parole officers
    41407Program officers unique to government
    42100Police officers (except commissioned)
    42100Police officers (except commissioned)
    42101Firefighters
    42102Specialized members of the Canadian Armed Forces
    42200Paralegal and related occupations
    42201Social and community service workers
    42204Religion workers
    43203Border services, customs, and immigration officers
    43204Operations Members of the Canadian Armed Forces
    44200Primary combat members of the Canadian Armed Forces
    50010Library, archive, museum and art gallery managers
    50011Managers – publishing, motion pictures, broadcasting and performing arts
    50012Recreation, sports and fitness program and service directors
    51100Librarians
    51101Conservators and curators
    51102Archivists
    51110Editors
    51111Authors and writers (except technical)
    51112Technical writers
    51113Journalists
    51114Translators, terminologists and interpreters
    51120Producers, directors, choreographers and related occupations
    51121Conductors, composers and arrangers
    51122Musicians and singers
    52100Library and public archive technicians
    52110Film and video camera operators
    52111Graphic arts technicians
    52112Broadcast technicians
    52113Audio and video recording technicians
    52114Announcers and other broadcasters
    NOC
    (TEER)
    OccupationTitle
    52119Other technical and coordinating occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting and the performing arts
    52120Graphic designers and illustrators
    52121Interior designers and interior decorators
    53100Registrars, restorers, interpreters and other occupations related to museum and art galleries
    53110Photographers
    53111Motion pictures, broadcasting, photography and performing arts assistants and operators
    53120Dancers
    53121Actors, comedians and circus performers
    53121Actors, comedians and circus performers
    53122Painters, sculptors and other visual artists
    53123Theatre, fashion, exhibit and other creative designers
    53124Artisans and craftspersons
    53125Patternmakers – textile, leather and fur products
    53200Athletes
    53201Coaches
    53202Sports officials and referees
    54100Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
    55109Other performers
    62010Retail sales supervisors
    62020Food service supervisors
    62023Customer and information services supervisors
    62201Funeral directors and embalmers
    63100Insurance agents and brokers
    63101Real estate agents and salespersons
    63210Hairstylists and barbers
    63220Shoe repairers and shoemakers
    64100Retail salespersons and visual merchandisers
    72022Supervisors, printing and related occupations
    72102Sheet metal workers
    72204Telecommunications line and cable installers and repairers
    72205Telecommunications equipment installation and cable television service technicians
    72302Gas fitters
    72405Machine fitters
    72406Elevator constructors and mechanics
    72420Oil and solid fuel heating mechanics
    72600Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors
    72602Deck officers, water transport
    72603Engineer officers, water transport
    NOC
    (TEER)
    OccupationTitle
    72604Railway traffic controllers and marine traffic regulators
    73310Railway and yard locomotive engineers
    73402Drillers and blasters – surface mining, quarrying and construction
    80022Managers in aquaculture
    83101Oil and gas well drillers, servicers, testers and related workers
    83120Fishing masters and officers
    83121Fishermen / women
    92013Supervisors, plastic and rubber products manufacturing
    92015Supervisors, textile, fabric, fur and leather products processing and manufacturing
    92020Supervisors, motor vehicle assembling
    92021Supervisors, electronics and electrical products manufacturing
    92021Supervisors, electronics and electrical products manufacturing
    92022Supervisors, furniture and fixtures manufacturing
    92024Supervisors, other products manufacturing and assembly
    92101Water and waste treatment plant operators
    93102Pulping, papermaking and coating control operators

    Source: SINP